Categories
Cultivation

Soul Pilgrimage, Death, and Loss • Tamsin Grainger • Qi173

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Our western world hides death. We are taught to avoid it. Avoid thinking about, do everything medically possible to prolong life, and focus on “more time” without regard to more of “what.”

In this conversation with Tamsin Grainger we look into how death is inextricably entangled with life. How we care constantly dying to one moment as we emerge into a new one.

Listen in to this conversation on living into the surprising unfolding of life and how the mindset of pilgrimage helps us to transition through the seasons of our lives.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • We are always dealing with little deaths
  • Thoughts on a good death
  • Sympathy and empathy
  • The influence of pilgrimage
  • Sitting in and being moved by qi
  • Not knowing is part of the clinical encounter
  • The wisdom that unfolds within the field of collective qi

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When in the presence of death, never assume you know what is needed. Listen to the qi – theirs and yours – and allow time for the simple as well as the complex.


I am a Shiatsu practitioner, teacher and writer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. I learned the depth of Shiatsu touch on receiving my first session – I felt I was being danced by her. The result was good too – the curse was lifted! In 1989, I started a course and have been learning and giving Shiatsu ever since. My practice began around the time I became a mother and focused on Shiatsu during pregnancy and with babies.

I began to walk pilgrimage in 2016 as I neared menopause and my daughters had left home. There, I realised that I should write about death because the subtle and varied touch of Shiatsu can support people on all levels when facing this greatest of challenges.

 

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Purchase your own copy of Working with Death and Loss in Shiatsu Practice, a guide to holistic practice in palliative care.

Read Tamsin's blog on the book, grief and Shiatsu.

A short discussion on coherence, quantum physics and shiatsu.

 

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Categories
Acupuncture

Balancing the Koshi • Jeffrey Dann • Qi168

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The medicines and martial arts of Asia have long considered the lower belly and back to be of significant importance in health, wellbeing and as a kind of seat of power and presence.

In this conversation with long time practitioner Jeffrey Dann we explore the structural powerhouse of the Koshi, the dynamic lower abdomen with all it’s energetic and physiological functions.

Additionally we explore how to approach the body and appreciate the body and develop a sense of listening and connection that becomes the compass that guides our work.

Listen into this discussion of discovery, appreciation and medicine.

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  • How Jeffrey found his way into East Asian medicine
  • The power of putting your hands on people
  • Importance of the dynamic reciprocal relationship
  • The Koshi and its central role in the body
  • The Gall Bladder as a fascial organizer
  • Using your hands to get information
  • What happens when the symmetry is off
  • Mapping acupuncture points onto visceral junctions and connections
  • Investigating the fascia

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“The difference between a master and great partitioner is in the details.

Master tip: Instead of just driving a needle in thru the guide tube, pause as the needle touches the skin. “Listen and Follow” is the response to the tip of the needle in response to the tissue.

Example: Does the person’s energetic field and tissues welcome OR resist the
presence of the needle. Find the welcome. Meridian therapy tells us to support the ease before dispersing the resistance.


Jeffrey Dann, L.Ac

More than 45 years of study and practice has led me to see acupuncture as a manual medicine. I combine refined palpation, movement, the meridian system, and the structural fascial matrix producing an integrative approach to mind/body wellness. I began this journey as an anthropologist studying martial arts body-mind education in Japan. After studying acupuncture in Beijing, Hong Kong and Hawaii throughout the 1980s, I studied structural acupuncture, SeiTai, Shinpo, and Sotai movement therapy in the 1990s. I then deepened my knowledge of Meridian therapy while bringing leading Meridian Therapy sensei to the US.

I started to put together the Koshi Balancing system with the support of Shudo Denmei in the early 2000s, and for the last 10 years have integrated Barral’s osteopathic Visceral Manipulation into hara abdominal work. Koshi Balancing is the culmination of my never-ending passion to deepen my holistic education while teaching acupuncturists and body workers to integrate manual medicine with the structural and visceral foundations of Traditional East Asian Medicine.

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Visit Jeffrey's website

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All Fruiting Body, No Grain Fillers

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Categories
Cultivation

Listening, Non-doing and Appreciative Attention • Alice Whieldon • Qi158

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Medicine is a curious business. The “agreement” is that the patient has a problem and we as practitioners are going to fix it. It’s not an unreasonable expectation in our fee for service world. And after all, we are the experts that are supposed to know how to resolve a medical condition.

But what often gets left out of the conversation is the question of “what is healing?” Along with “who” is responsible for that and “what” is to be done?

Healing is a curious business. And while patient and practitioner both play a role, more often than not, it’s an inside job.

In this conversation with Alice Whieldon we explore what is helpful, the invitation that arises from dropping expectation and agenda, and the connective resonance that arises from simply seeing how it is for another.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The World of Sei-Ki
  • Looking for the experience of deep change
  • Clearing practices
  • Sei-Ki Soho, guidance and harmony
  • Kishi's background and brilliance
  • The relief of being in a safe, expanse and solid presence
  • What are we when we stop applying theories?
  • Connecting clearly and well
  • The prison of diagnosis
  • What is help?
  • The medical model is a trap
  • Dropping expectation and agenda so as to “just see”
  • “I see how it is for you…”
  • The power of appreciation
  • You don’t have to be a fulltime xxx patients
  • We have to unfix ourselves
  • Letting it be
  • Intention vs Agenda

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Things are never quite what you think they are.  So the discipline of remaining open to your client and listening acutely to how it is for them, is crucial. Diagnosis, naming the condition, works against this and should be approached with caution.


Alice Whieldon MA PhD SFHEA, worked with Kishi from 1997 until his death in 2012.  Together they collaborated on a book, Sei-ki: Life in Resonance, the Secret Art of Shiatsu 2011 Kishi & Whieldon, Singing Dragon, London, with the assistance of his wife, Kyoko.  Alice offers Sei-ki workshops and sessions internationally. 

In addition, since the 1980s, she has been involved with the work of Charles Berner and Lawrence Noyes in Clearing and the Enlightenment Intensive workshop – a fusion of the zen sesshin and western communication techniques – see Mind Clearing: the key to mindfulness mastery 2016, Whieldon, Singing Dragon, London.  Alice was Senior Faculty Manager in Arts for the Open University and remains an Associate Lecturer in Arts and Humanities.  She is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and Chair of the Shiatsu Society (UK) 2016-18 during which time she oversaw a major restructuring and renewal.  With degrees in philosophy and religious studies, Alice is adept at offering the explanations often welcomed in learning Sei-ki.

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Visit Alice's personal website 
For more about Living in Resonance 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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The Medicine You Love 

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Acupuncture of Wandering Monks

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Categories
Acupuncture

Tung Style Acupuncture • Susan Johnson • Qi150

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There are many ways to do acupuncture. Each method gives you a glimpse into the workings of the body, each one gives you a different map of the terrain. And each method allows us to understand and problem solve with a different set of both mental and physical tools.

Susan Johnson studied with Miriam Lee, who was instrumental not just in bringing Tung Style acupuncture into our western world, but helping to get acupuncture going here in the first place. In this conversation we discuss not just the points and what they do, but more importantly a way of thinking about acupuncture so that you are utilizing the healing resources of your patient without squandering or dispersing them.

Listen into this conversation that starts with Tung acupuncture, but goes into how we think about the work we do, and the kind of spirit that we bring to it.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Susan’s background studying under Dr. Mirium Lee and Tung’s Points
  • Using Tung’s points and opposites 
  • Bleeding, it is not what you might think
  • How can traditional acupuncturists take and use Tung’s points and way of thinking
  • Putting people back in touch with what’s within them their “superpower”
  • Walkthrough of Susan’s process
  • Practice never gets boring and loving acupuncture 
  • Quieting yourself enough to listen to your patients
  • It takes time and experience really become educated as a Chinese medicine doctor
  • Sometimes you can’t fix everybody/not everybody is meant to be your patient

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Once you have studied, the academics and then Tung’s Acupuncture, the most important advise i could give any practitioner, is to silence your mind when sitting across from your patient, and listen for what it is you need to know to provide the best possible outcome. Most humans are constantly broadcasting what it is that they really need and want, what is missing in their lives. Allow them to pierce your open heart and mind, and you will know exactly what to do.


I suppose, as in any profession, there are outstanding acupuncturists and there are mediocre ones. I have committed my life to providing every tool i can think of to teach Master Tung’s Magic Points, an extraordinary ancient Taoist system of acupuncture, that will pretty much guarantee that you will have an outstanding practice and a bursting toolbox to treat just about anything that comes your way, with TCM. With 34 years of clinical practice and a brand new 565 page book, called, “Master Tung’s Magic Points: A Definitive Clinical Guide,” you’ll have enough to keep you busy for the next ten years, easily, and to build a very successful practice for yourself and your patients who need YOU.

My original teacher of this style of acupuncture was Dr. Miriam Lee, OMD., one of the first licensed acupuncturists in the state of California. In 1987, she and i travelled to HeFei, China, to study bleeding techniques with a third generation bleeder, the late Dr. Wang Xiu Zhen. It was life-changing, for sure. That same year, Dr. Lee introduced me to Dr. Young Wei-Chieh, who was a direct disciple of Master Tung Ching Chang, and who has been my primary teacher of this system, ever since. Dr. Young is still teaching and writing but has now closed his practice in Southern California.

Straight out of ACTCM, 1984, in San Francisco, i opened my first acupuncture practice in the Upper Haight/Ashbury district of San Francisco, in 1985. I specialized in the treatment of HIV/AIDS (at that time) and taught myself how to treat all kinds of common ailments and rare opportunistic diseases, things like Candida, Pneumocystis pneumonia, the side-effects of radiation and chemotherapy, Karposi’s Sarcoma, ITP, just to name a few. It was eye-opening for a young 25 year old and heart breaking to work so hard and watch 25 year olds die. I truly learned some extraordinary things, working on all of the AIDS wards in all of the major hospitals in San Francisco, but perhaps the most impactful was that when you die is not nearly as important as how you live!!!

In 1988, after nearly five years of intense stress and mind-blowing results with Traditional Chinese Medicine, i moved my practice to Santa Cruz, where I’d been living in the mountains, since 1979, and have practiced there ever since. Many of my HIV patients travelled to see me there, and some are still alive today.

 

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Links and Resources

Visit Susan's website for books, DVDs, online and live class offerings.

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Medicine Unfolds in Relationship

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

The Privlege and Burden of Practice • Rebecca Avern

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Spending time in the clinic seasons us. It exposes us to success, failure and unending questions about healing, wellbeing and connection that over time can help us to sit with our patients in the midst of deep difficulty.

In this conversation with Rebecca Avern we discuss the fortitude that must be developed to sit with the difficult to answer questions that arise in clinic. And how clinical work, while it deepens and enriches the lives of our patients and ourselves, does extract kind of price.

It would not be untrue to say doing our work is a privledge, and it also brings a certain kind of shadow.

Listen into this conversation on presence, inquiry, and listening with your qi. As well as a look at the shadow side of practice.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The surprising sense of relief of not having to practice
  • Our esteem for the luminaries
  • It’s better to listen with your mind than with your ears, better yet is to listen with your Qi
  • Working with our own emotions in the treatment room
  • How does the patient know they are better?
  • Mental models vs presence in the moment
  • That sinking moment we all must contend with
  • Moving beyond “I’m better”
  • Who is doing the “work”
  • The burden we willing bear
  • Beginner’s luck gives us a glimpse of possiblity
  • The right nudge at the right time
  • What is life and death about?
  • Sitting with the terrain
  • We airbrush out the difficulties the great doctors went through
  • Including that part of us that is burdened
  • Being with the questions
  • Entering the stream of life

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When I ‘found’ acupuncture, nearly 25 years ago, I felt as if I had come home.  Over the following years, I was privileged to study and work with several inspiring teachers.  I loved treating patients in clinic, the fact that every day involved deeper learning and at least a few surprises.  I felt honoured that people would share their inner worlds with me and was touched by seeing them evolve.  I thought I was the luckiest person alive to have found such work.

Then I gradually began to shift my focus to working with babies, children and teenagers.  Eventually, I decided to focus my clinical work solely on young people.  Now my clinic days consist of babies with eczema that is so bad they scratch themselves until it bleeds, toddlers who are on their sixth course of antibiotics for a persistent bladder infection, school-age children who have been labelled ‘difficult’ because they cannot sit still in class and teenagers who are having panic attacks on a daily basis.  My days are dynamic, challenging, sometimes heart-breaking and always uplifting.  To see a young person and their family transformed as the burden of illness is lifted, is truly magical.  Now I know that I really am the luckiest person alive to have found such work.

I am now on a two-fold mission!  The first is to help more practitioners feel confident and competent to treat babies, children and teenagers.  The second is to make more parents aware of what our medicine can do for their children, and that it can be delivered in a way that is acceptable, even enjoyable, to their child.

 

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation

The Dao of Communication • Margot Rossi & Nick Pole • Qi144

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You’ve noticed in the treatment room, that moment when something “lands” for the patient, and there's a palpable internal shift. You’ve noticed this in yourself, that a question can be inviting as a whisper, or make you bristle like a growling dog.

In this conversation with Margot Rossi and Nick Pole we explore Embodied Language, a way of connecting that is friendly to both the body and spirit.

What we say, and how we say it can have a profound impact on the experience of both patient and practitioner. Listen in for how you can use language as skillfully as you use your needles.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Learning to use body friendly language
  • Creating a container that is safe, secure and playful
  • Inviting a sense of possibility
  • Connecting with the experience of the body
  • Can you remember a time when?
  • What was it like when that happened?
  • What would you like to have happen?
  • Inhabiting the perspective of a beginner
  • Using questions that lead patients to themselves
  • Asking what’s needed? Rather than what’s wrong?
  • Allowing patients to hear what they are already saying
  • Accidently causing harm with the language we use

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Margot Rossi, L.Ac
It's not an exaggeration to say that Eastern medicine and philosophy saved my life. They have rocked my world for over thirty years. Along the way, here and in China, I've learned much from remarkable teachers, including my family, peers, patients and students. My mission is to share that bounty of wisdom with my community.

In private practice, I see myself primarily as an educator, aka wizard of possibilities. Creating a clinic environment conducive to learning and being a neutral sounding board, I use the interview process as my main modality for diagnosis and treatment. Patients and I explore the fabric of reality and build an awareness of experience and perceptions. Along with mindfulness, using nature's systems to understand ourselves helps us feel right at home and capable of shifting with self-compassion, confidence and resourcefulness.

Another essential in my repertoire is movement therapy either Dao Yin or yoga. I find mindful movement and breathing can influence all issues regardless of where they're housed, just like water can flow in places nothing else can or wants to go. This medicine keeps reminding me: there is wonder here, simply awaiting our presence.


Nick Pole
I've been practicing, teaching and writing about shiatsu since I graduated from the Shiatsu College in the UK in 1989. I spent the first ten years of my shiatsu studies trying to find the best teachers I could and then doing my best to copy them. It always worked for a while, but then I would come back to the same intangible sense that something important was missing. Meanwhile, to improve my skills as a shiatsu teacher, I studied NLP in some depth and that led me to Clean Language. That was it! – a way to bring language into my sessions by asking questions that make sense to the body. With its Zen-like simplicity and rigor, Clean Language invites both practitioner and client to listen to themselves in a truly mindful way.

How could someone who loved language as much as I did come to be practicing shiatsu, which in its original Japanese form at least is done almost without any words at all? Bringing this subtle and elegant questioning process into my sessions helps my clients listen to themselves, and helps us to come to a shared understanding of what they want to achieve. When you invite the bodymind into the conversation like this, painful and frustrating symptoms can rapidly turn into signposts on the path towards the kind of life a person really wants to be living. And in researching my book Words That Touch (2017), I found the neurological explanation for Lao Tzu's great riddle: the Tao that can be spoken of is not the “constant/eternal/real” Tao because speech traps us in the left brain hemisphere's abstract world of names, concepts and categories, at one remove from reality.

It's only through the right hemisphere and its wordless but deeply embodied way of knowing, that we can ever get a sense of what the unspoken Tao is really all about. This is how I love to work, integrating gentle and respectful questioning with the meridian-based bodywork of shiatsu. That way, we invite the two sides of the brain to have a better relationship with each other and our patients to have better relationships with themselves.

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Links and Resources

Read Nick's book Words That Touch, on the practice and use of Clean Language

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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PURE, SIMPLE and EFFECTIVE

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How to craft an effective food therapy consultation

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Categories
Cultivation

Social Connection & Knowing Our Essence • Panel Discussion • Qi141

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We are being invited, both by our conditions and circumstances and by people in our profession to “get online and do tele-medicine.” However much of what we do as acupuncturists does not translate well, as our most critical tool cannot be used in a digital form.

The questions that I’ve been noodling through for the past month plus are what is the essence of my work when I don’t have access to my kit of tools? And how would I describe what I do, when I can use my needles?

In this rebroadcast of a Lhasa webinar with Daniel Schulman, Alaine Duncan and Amy Mager as we explore the opportunities and challenges in this moment of transformation.


 

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Alaine Duncan has a unique approach acupuncture that integrates modern understandings of the neuro-biology of traumatic stress with ancient healing principles from Chinese medicine. This clinical fascination has carried her heart to places and people she never imagined when she graduated from acupuncture school in 1990, and completed Somatic Experiencing training in 2007.

She founded Integrative Healing, LLC in 2012 with a goal to integrate the wisdom of Chinese Medicine with the study of neurobiology and traumatic stress in both the classroom and the treatment room. Her research background includes studies assessing the impact of integrative medicine on compassion fatigue in military caregivers; acupuncture for treatment of combat-related traumatic stress, chronic headaches in Veterans with traumatic brain injuries, pain in Veterans of all conflicts, and Gulf War Veterans Illness.

Alaine was a founding member of the Integrative Health & Wellness program at the DC Veterans Administration Medical Center where she served as a clinician and researcher from 2007-2017.

 

Daniel Schulman graduated from New England School of Acupuncture in 1999.   He has been in private practice in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada since then.  He founded and chairs the Association of Registered Acupuncturists of Prince Edward Island.

For twenty years, Daniel’s clinical work centred around Japanese palpatory approaches, primarily those in the Nagano/Matsumoto lineage (but also including Keiraku Chiryo).  Following Nei Jing studies with Ed Neal, he expanded this into a more focused six channels perspective and in particular, an exploration of and fusion with Nei Jing Ren Ying Cun Kou pulse diagnosis.  This work involved what he calls a reverse engineered ‘palpate first, ask questions later’ approach.  More recently, Daniel has found himself in a radical clinical transformation via the elegant Sa’Am fusion of I Ching, 5 Phases and Six Levels.

Daniel has written many articles, published in the Journal of Chinese Medicine, the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, the North American Journal of Oriental Medicine and more.  A full list can be found on his website, www.danielschulman.ca where he also blogs.

Daniel’s daily practice is guided by three existentially terrifying realizations;

  • Anything can be anything (in other words, dysfunction in just about any channel or channel combination could be underlying just about any symptom)
  • Most patients exhibit no less than 12 ‘patterns’ and often more
  • At any moment in the clinical encounter, there are 10,000 things happening and at even the utmost level of awareness and presence, we may become aware of at most 30-40 of them.

Daniel marvels at the fact that even after two decades in practice, every day is novel, new and fascinating.

 

Amy Mager has been licensed to practice acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine since 1990. Amy graduated Magna Cum Laude from Brandeis University, and earned her MS in Chinese Medicine from ACTCM in 1989 and her  Doctorate in Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine and Integrative Medicine from the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in 2017. She apprenticed with midwife and acupuncturist. Raven Lang L.Ac. for two years.  She has been in private practice in CA and MA for over 29 years. She serves as Vice Chair of the American Society of Acupuncturists and has served on the Board of the Acupuncture Society of Massachusetts as well as a board member at large of the Maternity Acupuncture Association. She has served on the board of uprooted, a Jewish response miscarriage and pregnancy as well as the Green River Doula Network. Amy is also a trained birth educator, birth assistant, lactation counselor and End of Life doula.

Amy has been published in the books Parenting From the Heart and Round the Circle as well as on Huffington Post. Amy has published two articles in the Pacific College of Oriental medicine newsletter and JASA with her writing partner Christine Cronin DACM, Lic.Ac.. One on postpartum care, and 11 heat therapy.  She has a bi-weekly radio segment with Bob Flaherty on WHMP, “Healing Outside the Box, Inside the Heart”.  For a more in depth bio please visit www.WellnessHouseNorthampton.com

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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Categories
The practice of practice

The Essence of Our Work: A Heartfelt Inquiry Into Knowing What You Have to Offer Online • Mary Beth Huwe • Qi138

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.22″ custom_css_main_element=”.widget{|| margin-top: 20px !important;||}||”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.25″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_width_px=”1730px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.25″ background_position=”top_left” custom_padding=”|||” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_audio audio=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/qiological/The_Essence_of_Our_Work__An_Exploration_on_Knowing_What_You_Have_to_Offer_Online__MB_Huwe__Qi138.mp3″ title=”The Essence of Our Work: A Heartfelt Inquiry Into Knowing What You Have to Offer Online • Qi138″ artist_name=”Michael Max” album_name=”With guest, Mary Beth Huwe” image_url=”https://backend.qiological.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Grammas-Pie.jpeg” _builder_version=”4.2.2″ background_color=”#702a04″ title_font_size_tablet=”51″ title_line_height_tablet=”2″ caption_font_size_tablet=”51″ caption_line_height_tablet=”2″][/et_pb_audio][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row column_structure=”2_3,1_3″ _builder_version=”3.25″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ _builder_version=”3.25″ custom_padding=”|||” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text admin_label=”intro to show” _builder_version=”4.2.2″ text_font_size_tablet=”51″ text_line_height_tablet=”2″ header_font_size_tablet=”51″ header_line_height_tablet=”2″]With Covid-19 knocking the bottom out of our practices, there is a call from experts in the field to “get online.” Which isn’t bad advice as it does provide a channel to our patients in a time when we can't put our hands on them. But, and this is important, many of us don’t know what we would do online.

Somehow the idea of teaching acupressure leaves me completely cold. And as to helping people with their nutrition, well, most people I see don’t have much of an interest in that anyway. Add on to it, the fact that there are some things I know in theory, but from an embodied understanding I don’t have much to say.

So the question arises for me of “What in essence, and with integrity, can I share online?”

In this conversation with MB Huwe as we dig into that question. Listen in if you have questions about what can you from that genuine place in your bones bring to the online world.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_code disabled_on=”||on” admin_label=”Sponsor Code for advert” _builder_version=”4.2.2″ text_orientation=”center”]



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  • What is below the service you provide and the tools that you use?
  • The palpable difference between theory and experience
  • Before we can answer the question of what, we have to answer the question of essence
  • Discovering one’s essence is less a process of identifying and more a journey of revealing
  • Non-action is not inaction
  • Grandmas and pies
  • Looking at what you do from the perspective of an impartial observer
  • The importance of polarizing your offer
  • What are the things in our profession that bother you?
  • It’s not that there are things to do on the Internet that are wrong— but rather they might be wrong for you
  • When you are following the path of heart, few doors open, because only the right ones do
  • The opening and enlivening power of questions
  • Revisiting the influences in writing and art that have been pivotal for you in the past

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Mary Beth Huwe, L.Ac, Copywriting Wordsmith

​Part of what drew me to Chinese medicine – and what holds me here – is its endless emphasis on thoughtfulness and presence of mind. There is nothing dull or rote about acupuncture and herbal medicine; they are both at once timeless and spontaneous.

Understanding the universal ways of life – birth, growth, sickness, wellness, aging, death – and holding that knowledge while treating the individual person is a defining characteristic of practicing this medicine.

I love working with entrepreneurs, “makers,” artists, writers, performers, restaurant owners… in short, people whose work demands something particular of them. People whose personal unfolding happens to make a difference.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Links and Resources add link to FB page” _builder_version=”4.2.2″]


Links and Resources

Mary Beth Huwe is, among other things, a writer from (and in) the Appalachian mountains of Virginia. Her unique, strategic process helps business owners discover and clearly communicate the essence of their work in the world. To connect with Mary Beth visit marybethhuwe.com

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Share this podcast with your friends!

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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Categories
Cultivation The practice of practice

Listening • Michael Max • Qi137

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Listening is not a skill that I expected to develop. I thought I’d get good with palpation or pulse reading. After all, the masters are said to get what they need with the pause and a few questions. That’s what I was aiming for, however it did not work out that way for me.

I’ve found over the years that there is a way of listening to a patient that has allowed me to both uncover what I need to know to treat them, but more importantly, help me to better understand innate resources they have that they either are not in touch with, or curiously enough think are deficiencies or problems.

Listening is not passive, nor about just hearing what the patient says, it also involves an inner ear to our own experience.

This episode is a solo show in which I share some what my clinical experience has taught about an often overlooked yin aspect of our work— listening.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Talking to podcast guests is just like talking to patients
  • Listening for a patient’s strengths, weaknesses and resources
  • Unpacking 聽 the character for Listen
  • Listening is not passive, to goes both outward and inward
  • Listening is more important than knowing
  • Energetically leaving some space
  • Using your confusion to authentically connect
  • People have a hard time tracking their own experience
  • The power of silence
  • The difference between “you’re right” and “that’s right”
  • Listening patients into their own wisdom
  • Empathy

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There is a big difference between “you're right” and “that's right.” When you hear the former, you've lost the connection with your patient. When you hear the latter, you've touched in on something deep and essential.


Michael Max, L.Ac

I didn't set out to create a podcast show, in much the same way I didn't set out to learn acupuncture.

Those were not decisions that came from a flash of inspiration or childhood longing, but more like how something at the periphery of your vision catches your attention.

More like a hunch or decisive whisper. Those hunches have lead me through learning acupuncture, acquiring enough Chinese to allow me to engage texts in their original language and share some of that with our community of practitioners. And my practice has lead me to the expansive nature of questions and listening.

Listening has allowed me to be of service to patients who are not sure how they got to where they are, or where to go from here. I guess you could say that listening has helped me to find a set of maps that helps me to navigate in clinic and to trust the compass when there is no map. While I crave the certainty of answers, I'm more enlivened by the catalytic nature of questions that's what fuels the clinical encounter.

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Categories
Acupuncture

Attending to the Field of Healing • Esther Platner • Qi124

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There is something about connection that goes beyond words. There is a way of engaging with those who seek our help that goes beyond the ten questions. Connection is not something we do, it’s a way we are.

In this conversation with long time practitioner Esther Platner we explore the spaces that don’t quite fit into words. Tread into territories without maps. And sit for a bit with the curiosities and surprise that arise in clinic when we attend with an open awareness.

Beyond our theory, and beyond understanding there is a way we can meet our patients with a wide-open sense of inquiry that asks us to bring everything we have, and leave behind our preconceptions. Chinese medicine has its scholarly tradition, but we don’t so often hear from the poetic.

Here’s your opportunity.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Zero Field Theory
  • Landing on what’s true
  • A field is a region of influence
  • Sympathetic flight and flight lands us squarely in manifest reality
  • Recognizing outdate adaptations is the first step in releasing them
  • One way to strengthen and lengthen telomeres
  • Attachment is not helpful
  • Defining Health
  • How can I help today?
  • Grounding and practitioner fulcrums
  • Some words for new practitioners

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 Follow the scent of what sparks your Interest and Joy. Practice Presence. Along side the infinite study of our Medicine, is the necessity to cultivate deep listening from stillness.


Esther Plater, L.Ac
The calling to enter the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine came my way in 1982 as a result of being catapulted out of a professional dance career, due to a severe injury and even worse surgery.  What appeared to be a devastating blow was in fact the gift that directed my attention towards seeking help through acupuncture. During nine months of treatment not only did my body find a newly elevated equilibrium, my mind became enthralled with the natural beauty of this medicine and my spirit was reignited, recognizing that this was to be my path.

I graduated from ACTCM in San Francisco in 1986. Once licensed I zoomed into practicing and learning, which continues to this day.  Thirty three years down the road, my awe and appreciation for the depth, brilliance and mystery of our medicine continues to grow. Learning to be a Quantum Physician is an ongoing adventure! Currently I have an eclectic approach to treatment.

My central focus is assisting those whom I have the opportunity to work with in returning to their Essential Selves.  There are a number of windows of study that have become mainstays in my tool box including; SAAM, various Japanese styles, Worsley, Classical 5 Element, Cranial Sacral, Somatic Experiencing, and Nutritional counseling. What happens in the treatment room is a synthesis guided by the current need of each person, allowing for the creative process to unfold in the alchemy of presence.

At this juncture what I love the most about our medicine is that it is alive, informing us in all aspects of life, laying the foundation for living harmoniously whether working or drinking a cup of tea. It permeates my awareness that indeed, “everything is everything.”

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Links and Resources

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