Categories
Acupuncture

The Path of Moxibustion • Felip Caudet • Qi169

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My initial introduction to moxibustion was the classic Chinese mugwort cigar. I hated it. But only because my lungs are the weak link in my chain of being. The smoke was intolerable.

Japanese rice grain moxa, that was a whole other universe. It’s not that less is more, it’s that the focused and directed aspects of Japanese moxibustion invite a completely different experience of heat and sensation.

In this conversation with Felip Caudet we follow his path of discovery with moxibustion.

Listen in to this discussion on mugwort, calling and surrender to the path that beckons.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Moxibustion and Felipe’s story
  • Felipe’s journey to learning moxibustion
  • Doubts and challenges
  • How to keep moving forward when you’re not 100% sure this is the right decision
  • What Felipe does with moxibustion
  • Moxibustion vs needling

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Apply moxa with your heart. First, listen to the patient’s words, after, listen to the body with palpation. Only palpation can explain why, where and how moxa can be applied


Felip Caudet

I have been a physiotherapist and acupuncturist for 20 years. One day, years ago I fell in love with japanese moxibustion. I decided to leave needles and work only with moxibustion. Big shocks on my life were to meet Fukushima sensei and Shinma sensei (son of the famous japanese moxibustionist Isaburo Fukaya) and be accepted as student.

Going deep in moxibustion, I discovered that traditional japanese practice was not too much known outside of Japan. After that, I took the challenge to spread the work of this beautiful therapeutic art and the style of Fukaya.

Moxibustion can be a way of purification and healing the body and the soul. It allows you to go from the head (mind) to the hands (heart), from the idea to the true action.

 

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Links and Resources

Shinma, H (2015). The Treasure Book of Points Fukayakyu.

Young, M (2012). The Moon Over Matsushima. Insights into Moxa and Mugwort. Godiva Books

NAJOM (North American Journal of Orientl Medicine). Journal full of articles (and amazing clinic tips) written by all kind of practitioners of japanese healing techniques.

moxafrica.org (British Charity dedicated to investigate direct moxibustion inmunomodulation as an adjunctive treatment for tuberculosis, particularly when drug-resistant).

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Categories
Acupuncture

Balancing the Koshi • Jeffrey Dann • Qi168

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The medicines and martial arts of Asia have long considered the lower belly and back to be of significant importance in health, wellbeing and as a kind of seat of power and presence.

In this conversation with long time practitioner Jeffrey Dann we explore the structural powerhouse of the Koshi, the dynamic lower abdomen with all it’s energetic and physiological functions.

Additionally we explore how to approach the body and appreciate the body and develop a sense of listening and connection that becomes the compass that guides our work.

Listen into this discussion of discovery, appreciation and medicine.

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  • How Jeffrey found his way into East Asian medicine
  • The power of putting your hands on people
  • Importance of the dynamic reciprocal relationship
  • The Koshi and its central role in the body
  • The Gall Bladder as a fascial organizer
  • Using your hands to get information
  • What happens when the symmetry is off
  • Mapping acupuncture points onto visceral junctions and connections
  • Investigating the fascia

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“The difference between a master and great partitioner is in the details.

Master tip: Instead of just driving a needle in thru the guide tube, pause as the needle touches the skin. “Listen and Follow” is the response to the tip of the needle in response to the tissue.

Example: Does the person’s energetic field and tissues welcome OR resist the
presence of the needle. Find the welcome. Meridian therapy tells us to support the ease before dispersing the resistance.


Jeffrey Dann, L.Ac

More than 45 years of study and practice has led me to see acupuncture as a manual medicine. I combine refined palpation, movement, the meridian system, and the structural fascial matrix producing an integrative approach to mind/body wellness. I began this journey as an anthropologist studying martial arts body-mind education in Japan. After studying acupuncture in Beijing, Hong Kong and Hawaii throughout the 1980s, I studied structural acupuncture, SeiTai, Shinpo, and Sotai movement therapy in the 1990s. I then deepened my knowledge of Meridian therapy while bringing leading Meridian Therapy sensei to the US.

I started to put together the Koshi Balancing system with the support of Shudo Denmei in the early 2000s, and for the last 10 years have integrated Barral’s osteopathic Visceral Manipulation into hara abdominal work. Koshi Balancing is the culmination of my never-ending passion to deepen my holistic education while teaching acupuncturists and body workers to integrate manual medicine with the structural and visceral foundations of Traditional East Asian Medicine.

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Links and Resources

Visit Jeffrey's website

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All Fruiting Body, No Grain Fillers

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Following Balance and Flow • Jake Fratkin • Qi155

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It is surprising where life can take us. We follow a hunch or a nudge and somehow gain some momentum that in time generates wind for our sails.

Not many westerners in the 1970’s started along the road of Chinese medicine. In this long ranging conversation with Jake Fratkin we discuss his perspectives over time and his current thoughts on medicine.

Listen in for a conversation about herbs, TCM, Japanese acupuncture and the curious road of practice that unfolds when you follow your interests.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Always interested in medicine, but then ran into the biology vs chemistry perspectives
  • An unusual encounter with qi
  • The connections between meridian therapy, qi gong an taichi
  • How TCM acupuncture differs from meridian therapy
  • The Nan Jing’s influence on how Jake thinks about acupuncture
  • How deficiency and excess relate to other and why tonifying a deficiency can correct an excess
  • Acupuncture points are more than a location, there is also a directionality
  • Working with muscle testing
  • Pathology and treatment of the divergent channels, eight extras and the regular channels

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When confronted with a patient with a long history of multiple complaints, determine what is excess and what is deficiency. Always treat the excess first: move qi and blood, calm the affected zang-fu organ. Don't start with deficiency. Don't throw tonic herbs just because the patient is tired. This will only aggravate the stagnation. Treat deficiency much later. And if in doubt where to begin, treat the liver first. Remove stasis of qi and blood, clear heat, moisten yin and boost blood.


I started clinical practice in 1978. That's over 40 years! Yikes. There were no acupuncture schools when I started. I apprenticed with a Korean master for 7 years, in Chicago. He practiced meridian therapy, and and felt that all health problems can be fixed by “balancing the meridians!”. Later, I apprenticed with two herbalists, one a Chinatown doctor from Hong Kong, the other a well-trained TCM doctor from Lanzhou, China. I was fascinated by the colorful boxes of the patent medicines in the Chinatown pharmacy, and I wrote my first book on Chinese patent medicines in 1986. In 2001, that book got expanded into “Chinese Herbal Patent Medicines”, and then that book got completely rewritten in 2014 as “Essential Chinese Formulas”, concentrating on the GMP available products. It combined traditional indications, with commentaries from my own personal experience. I love this last book, it has so much practical information! I spent a year in Chinese hospitals studying herbal medicine in 1987-1988, which really developed my clinical skills, and then I taught herbal medicine since 1982 at various TCM colleges in the US, and to graduate seminars. In clinic, I specialize in internal disorders, respiratory, GI, pediatrics, and infections.

As for acupuncture, I still subscribe to the meridian balancing method as developed by Japanese practitioners. Currently I use a computerized meridian diagnostic program. I have synthesized the work of Yoshio Manaka, Shudo Denmai, and Miki Shima into the “3-Level Acupuncture Protocol”, which I discuss on my website. This is a great approach for internal disorders, immune enhancement, and stress reduction. I do not do much musculoskeletal work. My acupuncture approach is related to my qi gong practice, which I have followed even before my acupuncture studies. In conclusion, I am a great believer that East Asian medicine is far superior to Western medicine for most outpatient conditions, and I am so happy that you are also pursuing one of the many available pathways of our medicine and art.

 

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Links and Resources

Articles written by Jake:
Three Level Acupuncture Protocol
Using muscle testing in meridian therapy
Other articles and topics

Recommended reading:
Chinese Herbal Medicine: The Formulas of Dr. John Shen
A Walk Along the River: Transmitting a Medical Lineage through Case Records and Discussion

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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Medicine From the Heart

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Coupling precision inquiry with embodied presence to enhance patient outcomes

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Categories
Acupuncture

Rhythm and Motion: The Magic of Bamboo Moxa • Oran Kivity • Qi106

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The characters for acupuncture in Chinese, 針灸zhen jiu, literally translate as needle and moxa.

You surely were introduced to the cigar-like pole moxa and large cones of smoldering mugwort on slices of ginger or aconite in acupuncture school. Perhaps you also were exposed to the Japanese rice grain moxa techniques or burning balls of moxa on the head of needle. Not surprising there are a variety of forms of using Ai Ye to bring a kind of simulative heat into the body.

In this conversation we explore the use of moxa that is combined with touch, rhythm, warmth, and with an eye to the channel dynamics that Yoshio Manaka, one of the great masters of the 20th century, wrote about in Chasing the Dragon’s Tail.

Even if you don’t use much moxa in your clinical, you’ll find this percussive bamboo method goes beyond the simple induction of heat into the body. And indeed can be used in a variety of contexts where you’d usually employ a needle, but in this case, it’s motion, rhythm and moxa.

Listen in to this conversation that will have you looking at moxibustion in a whole new way.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • What drew Oran to moxa
  • Moxa with rhythm
  • Old school acupuncture point tapping from 16th century Japan
  • Manaka and frequencies of the body
  • Treating a troublesome trapezius
  • All this takes is a hollow bamboo tube and wakakusa moxa
  • The Ontake Channel on YouTube
  • Dr. Manaka’s legacy in the west
  • Consider the (zi wu) Chinese clock
  • Ontake works well with Balance Method correspondences
  • Four channels sets
  • Following the line of least resistance
  • Using beats per minute to treat different meridian
  • Book, YouTube and classes

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Next time you have a patient or family member with a sore throat, try this neat piece of mirroring. Turn them over and warm up the midline on the sacrum. If you don’t have Ontake, use a moxa stick and keep pressing the heat in with your left hand. If you have a metronome, sparrow peck at 104 beats per minute. Keep going for a few minutes till the sacrum feels nice and warm. Then ask them how they feel!


Oran Kivity, L.Ac

I’m a British acupuncturist living and working in Malaysia. I graduated from a TCM college in the UK in 1987 but after about ten years I retrained in Japanese acupuncture methods, namely Manaka-Style Acupuncture and later, Toyohari. Dr Manaka’s work introduced me to ideas about meridian frequencies and studying with the blind acupuncture teachers of the Toyohari Association opened my eyes (and hands) to the information stream from channel palpation.

In 2009 I got introduced to a very simple moxibustion tool in Japan, a piece of bamboo stuffed with moxa, and this triggered a Eureka moment, integrating all my previous disparate learnings and setting me on the path to become that Ontake guy, balancing channels with meridian frequency moxibustion.

Japanese acupuncture is usually very light, meaning treatment is minimal and palpation is soft. I take this lightness literally. While it’s important to be present when people are in pain, it’s also important to be make sessions fun, where appropriate. This is also true of teaching. People should enjoy what they learn and enjoy what they teach. I’ve had thirty years of fun practising acupuncture. I’m looking forward to thirty more.

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It's not a microsystem, it's the macrosystem

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Links and Resources

Visit the Ontake Channel on YouTube for some video lesson on using this warm bamboo moxa method

Oran, Brenda Loew, Stephen Birch and Junji Mizutani discuss Japanese acupuncture and moxibustion

Visit the Ontake Facebook group for more discussion on this gentle and effective method of treatment

Oran's book Moxa in Motion is available on the big river of books in both kindle and paperback formats

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Timeless Classics of Chinese Medicine

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