Categories
Herbal Medicine

Cycles of Transformation- Tang Ye Jing and Women’s Health • Genevieve Le Goff • Qi175

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Chinese medicine has a treasure house of methods and treatment for women’s health. From the work of Sun Si Miao to modern day practitioners women’s health has been a key concern in our medicine.

In this conversation with Genevieve Le Goff we explore the transformations of qi through the five phases and six confirmations as we discuss Fu Xing Jue and the mythic lost text, Tang Ye Jing.

Listen in to this discussion of women’s health and some ways of thinking about our medicine from a non-modern perspective.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Submerging the yang
  • Making sense of things in time and space
  • How the Tang Ye Jing fits in with other classics and treatises
  • Being your own devil’s advocate
  • Treating menstrual pain
  • Don’t confuse the transformations of the five phases with the transformations of the six conformations
  • The Shaoyin pivot
  • Sovereign and ministerial fire

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Genevieve Le Goff, L.A., is a Licensed Acupuncturist and Chinese Herbalist. She practices an ancient form of Chinese medicine that has its roots in the Classical Era of Chinese history (Han dynasty and prior). 

​Classical Chinese medicine views the human body as a microcosm of the universe. Therefore the health of the planet is inseparable from ours. In keeping with the highest precepts of the classical Chinese medical canons, a good doctor seeks to understand physiology in an ecological fashion, and to honor the roots of these insights by the observation and protection of natural rhythms.

After graduating from UC Santa Barbara with a BA in Environmental Studies & Ecology, and the Academy of Chinese Culture and Health Sciences with a MS in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Genevieve received special training in midwifery and gynecology, as well as extensive post-graduate training in Classical Herbal Formulation from the Institute of Classical East-Asian Medicine. This formulation system is in the lineage of Tian (Bawei) Heming, who practiced in the tradition of Zhang Zhong Jing's Shang Han Za Bing Lun. She is constantly engaged in research and study to further her ability to help her patients, and is now pursuing a second post-graduate degree at the Hunyuan Institute.

 

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Links and Resources

 

 

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Following Balance and Flow • Jake Fratkin • Qi155

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It is surprising where life can take us. We follow a hunch or a nudge and somehow gain some momentum that in time generates wind for our sails.

Not many westerners in the 1970’s started along the road of Chinese medicine. In this long ranging conversation with Jake Fratkin we discuss his perspectives over time and his current thoughts on medicine.

Listen in for a conversation about herbs, TCM, Japanese acupuncture and the curious road of practice that unfolds when you follow your interests.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Always interested in medicine, but then ran into the biology vs chemistry perspectives
  • An unusual encounter with qi
  • The connections between meridian therapy, qi gong an taichi
  • How TCM acupuncture differs from meridian therapy
  • The Nan Jing’s influence on how Jake thinks about acupuncture
  • How deficiency and excess relate to other and why tonifying a deficiency can correct an excess
  • Acupuncture points are more than a location, there is also a directionality
  • Working with muscle testing
  • Pathology and treatment of the divergent channels, eight extras and the regular channels

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When confronted with a patient with a long history of multiple complaints, determine what is excess and what is deficiency. Always treat the excess first: move qi and blood, calm the affected zang-fu organ. Don't start with deficiency. Don't throw tonic herbs just because the patient is tired. This will only aggravate the stagnation. Treat deficiency much later. And if in doubt where to begin, treat the liver first. Remove stasis of qi and blood, clear heat, moisten yin and boost blood.


I started clinical practice in 1978. That's over 40 years! Yikes. There were no acupuncture schools when I started. I apprenticed with a Korean master for 7 years, in Chicago. He practiced meridian therapy, and and felt that all health problems can be fixed by “balancing the meridians!”. Later, I apprenticed with two herbalists, one a Chinatown doctor from Hong Kong, the other a well-trained TCM doctor from Lanzhou, China. I was fascinated by the colorful boxes of the patent medicines in the Chinatown pharmacy, and I wrote my first book on Chinese patent medicines in 1986. In 2001, that book got expanded into “Chinese Herbal Patent Medicines”, and then that book got completely rewritten in 2014 as “Essential Chinese Formulas”, concentrating on the GMP available products. It combined traditional indications, with commentaries from my own personal experience. I love this last book, it has so much practical information! I spent a year in Chinese hospitals studying herbal medicine in 1987-1988, which really developed my clinical skills, and then I taught herbal medicine since 1982 at various TCM colleges in the US, and to graduate seminars. In clinic, I specialize in internal disorders, respiratory, GI, pediatrics, and infections.

As for acupuncture, I still subscribe to the meridian balancing method as developed by Japanese practitioners. Currently I use a computerized meridian diagnostic program. I have synthesized the work of Yoshio Manaka, Shudo Denmai, and Miki Shima into the “3-Level Acupuncture Protocol”, which I discuss on my website. This is a great approach for internal disorders, immune enhancement, and stress reduction. I do not do much musculoskeletal work. My acupuncture approach is related to my qi gong practice, which I have followed even before my acupuncture studies. In conclusion, I am a great believer that East Asian medicine is far superior to Western medicine for most outpatient conditions, and I am so happy that you are also pursuing one of the many available pathways of our medicine and art.

 

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Links and Resources

Articles written by Jake:
Three Level Acupuncture Protocol
Using muscle testing in meridian therapy
Other articles and topics

Recommended reading:
Chinese Herbal Medicine: The Formulas of Dr. John Shen
A Walk Along the River: Transmitting a Medical Lineage through Case Records and Discussion

 

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Medicine From the Heart

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Coupling precision inquiry with embodied presence to enhance patient outcomes

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Chinese Medicine & Covid19- The Perspective From China • Shelley Ochs & Thomas Garran • Qi151

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The Chinese and people of East Asia deal with epidemic disease on a regular basis. And every time a new bug comes to town, they learn a little more.

While we in the west have access to some of the classic materials on treating epidemics, we don’t have the same level experience. It’s not really our fault, epidemics don’t roll through here in the west as often, and even during the cold and flu season most people don’t seek us out first. So our skills are not as polished as we’ve not had the experience to hone our clinical skills.

In this speical edition conversation with Thomas Avery Garran and Shelley Ochs we discuss their new eBook on Chinese medicine and Covid-19.

Listen in to this conversation on how the Chinese are using traditional medicine at a scale we simply don’t see here in the west.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Introduction and How Shelly and Thomas ended up in Beijing
  • Working on their book about growing herbs
  • How did they write the COVID book
  • How to treat millions of people with herbs
  • How did those on the front lines stay healthy?
  • Are China’s numbers accurate?
  • Treating patients as they should be treated
  • Shelby and Thomas’s thoughts on the future of Covid and possible future waves
  • Important steps for immunity in Chinese medicine
  • Adjusting to treating during a pandemic
  • What have you learned from doing this book?

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Always listen to your patients with a empathetic and compassionate heart. Be willing to make a mistake, and more importantly, be willing to admit it and learn from it. We are all practicing.


Thomas Avery Garran, P.hD
I've been at this herbal medicine thing since I bought my first herb book in 1989 while traveling to California. Not long after that, I found Chinese medicine and instantly fell in love. I've never looked back and now integrate my initial love of herbs with Chinese medicine, which can be found in my first two books about using Western herbs in Chinese medicine (2008 & 2014). In fact, my PhD work here in China was a comparative study of history, genetics, and chemistry of European motherwort and Chinese motherwort.

I believe that the system of Chinese medicine is awesome and beautiful, and evolving. I enjoy learning about how others have interpreted our medicine's theory and find the study of how plant usage has changed over time fascinating and insightful. These are the pillars that inform me when I write a prescription; the understanding of how the theories and application of medicinals has evolved and must continue to do so to stay relevant.

In recent years I've become more involved with farming herbs including the practical and research aspects of that profession, which has captured my heart; the translation of Growing Chinese Herbs (2019) was a step to begin to bring authentic cultivation information to the English reader. While I continue to study and write about application of herbs, I have shifted a significant amount of energy to the production of our medicinal plants, from seed to finished product. This, I believe, is a major part of Chinese medicine that is missing outside of China and I am working to change that even as you read this.

 

Trust your sensory perceptions. We encounter patients with all of our faculties and being open to the full range of information they give us makes us the best practitioners we can be.


Shelley Ochs, Ph.D.
My first encounter with Chinese medicine was as a patient in Taizhong, Taiwan back in 1989 when a friend of mine strongly suggested I go to see his Chinese herbalist to help me with the recurring upper respiratory tract infections I was suffering from. The herbs worked like a charm and I was so impressed that I made him my family doctor from then on. That same friend later attended my graduation from ACTCM in San Francisco in 2000.

Before and after graduation, I was very fortunate to be able to work in free or low-cost clinics serving anyone who walked in the door, often including homeless people and those with a dual diagnosis of mental illness and drug addiction. I learned what acupuncture can do when it’s all you have. It was heart-wrenching work at times, but what I learned there about being a doctor is still with me today.

It’s been thirty years since I first began studying Chinese, and it’s led me through literature and politics to medicine, and finally to history and translation studies. My initial motivation was simply a desire to better understand the people who were a part of the dynamic culture and society of Taiwan in the early 90s. Later, as I entered the stream of classical Chinese medicine, I wanted to know how we might participate in a conversation with the recorded tradition that still informs and inspires many of our colleagues and teachers. I hope that my current work will help bring people who do not read Chinese into a more meaningful engagement with this living tradition.

In 2013 I completed a Ph.D. in the History of Chinese Medicine, focusing on what the legend of Bian Que tells us about cosmology and the origins of acupuncture in China. I plan to expand this now that more material has been excavated and write it up in English. More immediately, I am collaborating with others here in Beijing to translate texts that are both clinically and philosophically relevant to practitioners around the world.

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Links and Resources

Download and read Chinese Medicine & Covid19, and donate to help support the work.

Visit Thomas' Passiflora Press website for more information on the growing, research and production of Chinese herbs 

 

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Tracing the Wind- Designing and Implementing a Study on the Treatment of Symptoms from Possible Covid19 with Chinese Herbal Medicine • Lisa Taylor-Swanson & Lisa Conboy • Qi145

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The scientific method is useful. It helps us to better understand the world by screening out our biases, beliefs and wishful thinking. The process of crafting a good hypothesis begins not with a great question, but first the more yin process of observation. Seeing what is present, and from there we can begin to distill out questions worth asking.

Much of traditional research is not that helpful in understanding Chinese medicine, as our medicine does not lend itself to the binary world of double blind studies. Our medicine requires research methodologies that can handle emergent dynamic systems. And lucky for us, those models exist and one of the researchers who is keen on these models also happens to be a Chinese medicine practitioner.

In this special podcast episode researchers Lisa Taylor-Swanson and Lisa Conboy share with us the design of a study that is currently being carried at the Seattle Institute of East Asian Medicine on the treatment of symptoms that may be related to Covid19 disease using Chinese Herbal Medicine. This study is geared toward collecting data that will help to guide further research. It’s a study that considers Chinese medicine on its own terms. And this study’s design principles are not unlike the principles of our medicine.

Listen in for a look at how this study is being structured, and then check back in a few weeks as we’ll have a conversation with the practitioners at SIEAM who are treating patients and collecting the data.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Gaps in evidence base of knowledge
  • Researching Chinese medicine on Chinese medicine’s terms
  • Using pragmatic design
  • Need for clear observation before deciding what questions to ask
  • Truth vs Emergence
  • Information is alive
  • Empathy and observation
  • Is there a perfect state of health?
  • How the SIEAM study is constructed and what we are looking for
  • Emergence and living systems are inherently unpredictable
  • The exqusite beauty of a big dataset
  • Who we ask, how we ask and cultural assumptions

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Lisa Taylor-Swanson, Ph.D, L.Ac
 I am a happy geek who has fallen in love with both clinical practice and with research. Let me tell you a bit about each part of my career, and how they connect with one another. I started out as an undergrad investigating mother-infant communication. At about age 21, I discovered dynamic systems theory. That theory pretty much sums up how I see, think, and feel. It's the idea that the whole is not merely the sum of its parts and that to best understand any phenomenon, we must study the whole. It was a natural fit, then, for me to study traditional East Asian medicine (TEAM) given the holistic framework we use to diagnose and treat people. It was with this whole systems, whole person framework that I moved from Utah to Washington to study at Seattle Institute of East Asian Medicine.

Research is fun. It is creative, generative, and dynamic. I am interested in discovering how we can more fully experience our body – embodiment, or embodied self-awareness – and live less in our heads.

We are inherently social beings and that social context, re-created in healthy and nurturing clinical contexts, supports embodiment and being present in one's lived experience. My research is investigating these topics, and a few others. I've been so incredibly fortunate to complete at PhD at the University of Washington and most recently join the faculty at the University of Utah (my undergraduate alma mater!). I'm one of a couple of handfuls of acupuncturist-researchers and I'm happy to live my dreams.


Lisa Conboy, Sc.D
Lisa is a social epidemiologist and a sociologist with an interest in the associations between social factors and health. 

She is published in the areas of Women's Health, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and qualitative research methodology. An Instructor at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, she is also the research director and faculty at the New England School of Acupuncture where she teaches research methodology and oversees multiple projects. 

She is also a founding member of the Kripalu research collaborative which examines the mental, physical, and spiritual benefits of yoga, meditation,

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Considering Covid-19, Methods and Safety • Craig Mitchell • Qi130

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The coronavirus has not only found its way into our bloodstream and mucus membranes, it’s worked its way into our social fabric, economic relations and political disagreements. In this age of global electronic connection news of this new virus creates perhaps more noise than signal.

In this conversation with Craig Mitchell we discuss how the effectivness of Chinese medicine is based not on someone else’s successful prescription, but on our ability to skillfully apply our diagnostic methods. We also touch on the importance of not just treating this disease, but also being sure we don’t become vectors for its spread.

Doctors in the past have confronted these kinds of epidemics. Now it’s our turn at bat.

Listen in to this conversation that reminds us the power of our medicine lies in how we apply it, and the need to attend to limiting the spread of infection.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The importance of differential diagnosis
  • Walking into the treatment room with an open mind
  • Not spreading infectious disease is a responsibility we need to consider and take seriously
  • What guidelines to follow
  • It might be useful to consider strategies from the Wen Bing tradition
  • San Ren Tang and Hou Po Xia Ling Tang
  • There might be a damp component with Covid-19

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Three-Seed Decoction (sān rén tāng), while an excellent
formula for externally-contracted illnesses, can also be used for
internal conditions characterized by damp turbidity, perhaps plus heat, in the interior, causing symptoms such as low-grade or tidal fever, headaches, stifling sensation in the chest, and painful heavy body. The dampness may also hinder the middle burner, causing symptoms such as nausea, poor appetite, copious phlegm, thirst with no desire to drink, and unsmooth bowel movements, which may also be sticky.


Craig Mitchell, Ph.D, L.Ac

Craig Mitchell received a Master of Science degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco (1993).Craig completed his PhD from the China Academy of TCM (Beijing) in 2006.

He has written numerous articles and translated several Chinese medical texts, including On Cold Damage: Translation and Commentaries. Craig has been in private practice since 1993 and has been actively teaching since 1997. He is the President of the Seattle Institute of East Asian Medicine, where he is also a clinic supervisor and teacher. Since 1997, Craig has taught classes on Chinese herbal medicine, internal medicine, medical Chinese, acupuncture
techniques, and tuina.

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Links and Resources

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Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Special Episode- Treating the Coronavirus With Chinese Medicine • Jin Zhao • Qi126

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The coronavirus that emerged in Wu Han earlier in this year has disrupted travel and business and has been a deep cause of concern as doctors throughout the world, and especially in China, strive to understand the nature of this pathogen. Conventional medicine brings it’s modern research techniques to this inquiry. While those of us in the Chinese medicine world seek to understand this modern epidemic disease through the lens and prisms of Chinese medicine.

In this conversation with Cheng Du doctor Jin Zhao we discuss his perspective on the illness induced by the coronavirus based on the observations and experience of a number of doctors he’s working with along with his own experience and his perspective gleaned from his long term study of various schools of thought in Chinese medicine.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • 瘟疫 wen yi, epidemic disease
  • The hospitals are full and sometimes people waiting to get in will turn to Chinese medicine
  • The Coronavirus is seen as a cold damp toxin
  • Ideas for treating this comes from the Wen Yi Lun and the Shi Re Bing Pian
  • Key Rx are Hou Po Xia Ling Tang and Jia Jian Zheng Qi San
  • Key herbs include, hou xiang, hou po, ban xia, and fu ling
  • Seasonal climatic factors that influence the situation in Wu Han
  • These patients tend to have thick, white, greasy tongue coatings
  • For some patients the condition will stay cold, but in others it turns to heat
  • No one formula for prevention as we have to consider a person’s unique constitution
  • Frequence with which the herbs need to be changed
  • Paying attention to the tongue coating is key in treating this illness
  • Consider the effect of western pharmaceuticals on the patient’s condition

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Doctor Jin Zhao

Jin Zhao is a busy clinical practitioner and professor of Chinese medicine in Cheng Du. He comes from a family of herbalists and has a particular interest in understanding and blending the various schools of thought in Chinese medicine.

 

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Links and Resources

The books Jin Zhao refers to are the:
吳又可 (瘟疫綸)
Discussion of Warm Epidemics, by Wu You-Ke

薛雪  (濕熱病篇)
Writings on Damp-Heat Pathogen Disease, by Xue Xue

The Main formulas that he uses as a base are:
藿樸夏苓湯, Hou Po Xia Ling Tang

加減正氣散
Modified Zheng Qi San

Here's an example of the kind of tongue you'll see with the coronavirus.

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Stalking the Wild Caterpiller Fungus • Jeff Chilton

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Cordyceps is one of the precious medicinals of the Chinese medicine pharmacopeia. It’s a wild grown substance that has only recently begun to give up the secrets to how it can be cultivated so that its health benefits can be enjoyed by more than a privileged few.

In this part two conversation with mushroom researcher and grower Jeff Chilton we hear about his recent trip to China for an international mushroom conference and get the low down on some exciting news about the “winter bug, summer grass”

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Why China has become the Middle Kingdom of the mushroom cultivation world
  • Some highlights of the recent international mushroom conference in China
  • The amount of research on mushrooms being done in China is staggering
  • Mushroom growing environments
  • There are over 800 types of medicinal mushrooms
  • Triterpenes and the Liver
  • Cultivating morel mushrooms
  • Ghost moths and Cordyceps spores
  • Science, as good as it is, has not tracked down the active constituent in Cordyceps
  • Different types of Cordyceps
  • One fungus one name
  • Cultivation of Cordyceps
  • Beta glucans, Alpha glucans, erogosteral, and ergotamine
  • Chaga: mushroom of the moment
  • The effect of Lion’s Mane on the nervous system

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Jeff Chilton, raised in Pacific Northwest, studied Ethno-mycology at the University of Washington in the late sixties. In 1973 he started work on a commercial mushroom farm in Olympia, Washington. During the next 10 years he became the production manager, responsible for the cultivation of over 2 million pounds of agaricus mushrooms per year. He was also involved in the research and development of shiitake, oyster and enoki mushrooms which resulted in the earliest US fresh shiitake sales in 1978.

In the late seventies he was a founder of Mycomedia, which held 4 mushroom conferences in the Pacific Northwest. These educational conferences brought together educators and experts in mushroom identification, ethnomycology, and mushroom cultivation. During this period Jeff co-authored the highly acclaimed book, The Mushroom Cultivator, which was published in 1983.

In the 1980's he operated a mushroom spawn business and in 1989 he started Nammex, a business that introduced medicinal mushrooms to the US nutritional supplement industry. He traveled extensively in China during the 1990's, attending conferences and visiting research facilities and mushroom farms. In 1997 he organized the first organic mushroom production workshop in China.

A founding member of the World Society for Mushroom Biology and Mushroom Products in 1994 and a Member of the International Society for Mushroom Science, Mr Chilton's company was the first to offer a complete line of Certified Organic mushroom extracts to the US nutritional supplement industry. Nammex extracts are used by many supplement companies and are noted for their high quality based on scientific analysis of the active compounds.

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Links and Resources:

Here are some highlights from Jeff's recent trip to China for the 10th International Medicinal Mushroom Conference

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Treating Psoriasis with Chinese Herbal Medicine • Sabine Schmitz • Qi107

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With Chinese medicine we know that issues of the skin are more than skin deep. That imbalances in the internal environment can manifest on the exterior. And that if we focus solely on what is seen on the surface, we’ll miss the larger picture that is unfolding below.

In this conversation we explore dermatological conditions with an eye toward internal organ function, the emotions and how diagnosis can be easy but the treatment more difficult.

Listen in to the conversation on healthy skin from the inside out.

 

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This Episode Sponsored By:



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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Time in China shows that you can learn to work quickly and see lots of people
  • Skin conditions often have an emotional component
  • High dose of tu fu ling can be helpful for acne on the back
  • Treating women with period issues and acne
  • The importance of setting patient’s expectations
  • Considering the size and type of scales
  • In some ways diagnosing skin diseases is easy, but treatment is more difficult
  • Paying attention to the lesions on the skin will tell you much of what you need to know
  • Why patients telling you their diagnosis is not helpful
  • Becoming fluent with herbs
  • Basics to watch for and inquire about when treating skin conditions

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TCM is a wonderful medicine but it’s true, it is not always easy to explain the TCM theories to new patients. So it’s always good to try to keep it as simple as possible and explain it in a language that patients understand. By explaining clearly and avoiding alien concepts patients will find that it is easy to understand. You will find out that almost all patients will love acupuncture and are willing to drink Chinese herbal decoctions although they have never done it before.


Sabine Schmitz (MMed TCM, China)

I am a TCM practitioner based in Cologne, Germany. I am a graduate of the Zhejiang Chinese Medical University (ZCMU) in Hangzhou, China, where I majored in Chinese medical Dermatology.

I have been working in the medical field for about 25 years. This includes work in hospitals, laboratories, universities, research and so on – I never did something else. For me, it was always clear that I either want to work with patients or do medical research. Funnily enough, I did both for 15 years before I started my own TCM practice. However, I have always enjoyed traveling to Asia. Plus I wanted to learn a medicine, which is natural, proven and effective and that I could believe in. TCM was a logical result from this thinking process and so I began studying and later practicing TCM.

My particular interest in and the focus of my practice lies on Skin Diseases (Chinese Dermatology), Gynecological Disorders (Chinese Gynecology) and Fertility Treatment. I decided relatively early to specialize in Chinese Dermatology and Chinese Gynecology. This specialization gives me the chance to see the patients I want to see and to get better in both areas. Both fields fit perfectly well to each other. I mainly work with acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. I just love what I do.

 

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You'll be surprised at what your hands can tell you

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Links and Resources

Visit Sabine's practice —  www.chinamed-koeln.com

For Sabine's book and all upcoming books —  www.chinamed-publishing.com

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Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Considering the Soil: An Agrarian Perspective on Chinese Herb Cultivation • Jean Giblette • Qi097

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.0.66″ custom_css_main_element=”.widget{|| margin-top: 20px !important;||}||” inner_width=”auto” inner_max_width=”1080px”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” background_size=”initial” _builder_version=”3.0.66″ custom_width_px=”1730px” width=”80%” max_width=”1080px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ background_position=”top_left” custom_padding__hover=”|||” custom_padding=”|||”][et_pb_audio _builder_version=”3.26.5″ title=”Considering the Soil: An Agrarian Perspective on Chinese Herb Cultivation • Qi097″ artist_name=”Michael Max” album_name=”With guest, Jean Giblette” background_color=”#702a04″ title_font_size_tablet=”51″ title_line_height_tablet=”2″ caption_font_size_tablet=”51″ caption_line_height_tablet=”2″ image_url=”https://backend.qiological.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/considering-the-soil.jpeg” box_shadow_horizontal_image_tablet=”0px” 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There is more to growing herbs than understanding plants. There are the considerations of soil, economic environment, weather patterns, cultural and market forces, and the kind of eye and vision that can see the interactions of these forces not just over seasons, but years or decades. 

In this conversation we explore the cultivation of Chinese herbs here in the West with one of the pioneers of the movement to bring domestic cultivation of Chinese herbs from a curiosity to viable economic reality. 

Listen in for a glimpse the ecosystem required that makes domestic production of Chinese medicinals a possibility. 

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The Chinatown tour that changed everything
  • Robert Newman, the Johnny Appleseed of American Chinese herb cultivation (now at Emperor's College)
  • The “underground” network that shares plant material
  • The difference between hobby and production gardens
  • It all comes back to the soil
  • The issue is our loss of connection with Nature
  • Practice is so different from theory
  • Industrial vs Agrarian values
  • The importance of the microbial health for the soil
  • Restoration agriculture
  • Sustainably growing herbs for the American market is a decade or more long project
  • How we can help support the development of sustainable medicinal herbs grown in the USA

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Jean Giblette 

In late 1993 Chinese herbal medicine hit me like a bolt from the blue. I was at Lin Sister Herb Shop in New York Chinatown, soon after that was led to study with Dr. Jeffrey C. Yuen and was launched on an incredible journey.

The plants called me. I was 45 years old, knew that clinical work was not for me but was fascinated by traditional herbal medicine. Everything in my experience coalesced at that point — my childhhood in rural Minnesota, my high school summer job working for agronomy grad students at NDSU in Fargo, my post-college career in community mental health research, administration and fundraising, and especially our move to Philmont, a rural village in upstate New York.

Now, 25 years later, my journey continues to offer amazing revelations around each bend in the road. It's a great privilege to work with East Asian Medicine practitioners, scientists and farmers in the USA and to develop domestic production of Asian medicinal herbs. The path has led in recent years to China, where I advocate for ecological agriculture. Traditional medicine and ecological agriculture are our royal road to health — that’s why I remain an optimist.

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An East/West Integrated Approach to
Healing Trauma and Building Resiliency

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Links on soil & health:
Charles Massy: How regenerative farming can help heal the planet and human health

Gabe Brown:  Keys to Building a Healthy Soil

 

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Classic Medicine & Rich Clinical Experience
Study Herbal Medicine with Dr Yu, and a
Group of Accomplished Western Chinese Medicine Herbalists

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