Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum • Qi160

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We often consider the Five Phases when doing acupuncture, and the Six Conformations when treating our patients with herbal medicine.

In this Part Two conversation with Sharon Weizenbaum  we consider the interplay of “wu yun, liu qi” the five movements and six climatic qi from the perspective of diagnosis and understanding not just what problem a patient has, but also its progression through time.

Listen in to this discussion on understanding the cycles and interplay of yin and yang that will help you to better understand why a patient’s illness has manifest and how to use both the movement of the phases and the influence of the conformations to treat illness and help your patients.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The classics are a way to shift your worldview
  • The way the Shang Han Lun is organized is part of the information it has to transmit
  • The importance of tracking the Yang
  • The Nei Jing is about understand physiology through numbers
  • The five phases is about seeing what is happening now, the six jing is about seeing how problems arise and potentially resolve
  • The wu yun liu qi is about time/space motion
  • Zang-fu diagnosis is helpful, but it’s static, it does tell you about the dynamic of the organs with the fluids and blood
  • Tracking the yang through open-close-pivot
  • Diagnosis are more reveled than discovered, when you see clearly how things ares
  • A case of leukemia treated with Bai Hu Tang
  • Blood stasis is always a branch
  • Problems of yin conformations is the failure to store, problems of yang conformations are the failure to move through
  • It’s not so much about trapped pathogens, but more about the body not functioning properly
  • The six conformations are not layers, they are a circular flow
  • Lu Li Hong’s Classical Chinese Medicine

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I can hardly believe that it’s been 38 years since I heard about Chinese medicine and caught the bug. Little did I know that I would never recover from my intense involvement in this endlessly interesting medicine. The path of Chinese medicine, for me, has been sleuth-like and consequently circuitous. Though I didn’t know it at the time, graduating for acupuncture school left me with crude tools for healing. There were gaps in my ability to see into a patient’s pathology clearly and to effectively help. What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I had a fundamental assumption that the fault was not in the heart of Chinese medicine itself. It was in my access to the heart of it and in my ability to really GET it.

So began a journey into the Chinese language, extraordinary teachers and the classics of Chinese medicine, always with the questions as my guides: What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I was lucky to be able to study with two super smart Chinese medical ob-gyn doctors in mainland China, Dr. Qiu Xiao-mei and Dr. Cheng Yu-Feng.

Then, The discovery of the depth of the Shang Han Za Bing Lun and its relationship to the Nei Jing and Tang Ye Jing, was a landslide event in my journey, permanently implementing a process that, to this day, clears my clinical vision. Through my own reading and studying, and through the help of teachers like Dr. Huang Huang, Fu Yan-Ling, Feng Shi-Lun, Arnaud Versluys, Edward Neal and soon-to-be Yu Guo-Jun, the path unfolds.

Throughout, I have not been a follower or disciple of a particular tradition. I like to be attuned to what makes sense to me. I like to learn and be aware of what resonates, clarifies, opens up knowledge and what feels limited, contrived, heady or unhelpful. I encourage this process in my students because ultimately, all of us have to make this medicine our own, learn, receive and enact it in a way that speaks deeply to us and gives us those “oh I SEE” moments with our best teachers, our patients.

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Calm Shen, Clear Focus

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Voices of Our Medical Ancestors- Using the classic texts in modern practice • Leo Lok • Qi159

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We give a great amount of respect to the Classics in Chinese medicine, but understanding these foundational texts of our medicine can be challenge, even if you do understand the old form of Chinese.

Just as many of struggle to get through the brilliance of Shakespeare, the classics of Chinese medicine require a particular kind of attention. And it doesn't hurt if you actually can understand the “gu wen” classical Chinese language. It's even more helpful if you engaged the other classic literature of China from an early age.

Our guest in this episode Leo Lok did just that, and in this conversation we see how terse lines from the classics can speak eloquently to confusing cases in the modern clinic.

Listen in and get a glimpse at how the classics can be applied to difficult clinical cases. You'll be wanting to spend more time with the Su Wen (Simple Questions) after this!

 

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Show Highlights

  • The classic Chinese literature and its influence
  • Modern mind and its perception of the ancient world
  • Using images to bring more understanding of the philosophy/non material things
  • Case discussion, Paleo and banana diet
  •  How to better understand the context of concepts, like children learning language through emotion response to scenarios
  • Case discussion, sprained finger and healthy diet
  • Case discussion, some trouble with breathing
  • Suggestions to listeners to get better understanding of the classic
  • How the classics can be a bit dry and how we can put the juice back into it
  • Connecting the ancient texts to modern experience

The guest of this show 

Leo Lok L.Ac. (M.Ac.O.M) is a licensed practitioner of Chinese Medicine and has a private practice in the San Francisco Bay Area.

He is also the creator of “Voices of Our Medical Ancestors” (www.facebook.com/cma.Voices), a Facebook page that highlights the vast historical treasures of Chinese medical literature via multimedia presentations.

An avid contributor of the 4500-member group: “Scholars of Chinese Medicine“, Leo has helped researched and answered more than a thousand questions on the historical development, interpretations and translations of Chinese medical topics for colleagues worldwide.

 


Links and Resources

Visit the Voices of Our Medical Ancestors over on Facebook.

 

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The Classical Medicine You Love

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation

Qi Anatomy • Brenda Hood • Qi116

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The way we make sense of structure helps us to understand function. Drawing lines and divisions helps us to understand parts. But a keen understanding of the parts does not always help us to see the whole of the functioning of those parts.

The anatomy of qi gives us a kind of bi-ocular view of function and form. It helps us to understand a system, even as we are part of that system. And it invites our western minds, which have been cultivated on carving the world into pieces, to glimpse the unity of those parts.

Listen in to this conversation on qi anatomy, Daoism and the influences of pre and post heaven influences.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The elegance of channel interactions in Saam Acupuncture
  • Micro system don’t work on channel theory, they work on resonance
  • There are channels, but there are also “fields”
  • The rational mind does not see integration, it sees divisions
  • Non-rational is not the same irrational
  • Thoughts on the pulse
  • Blood is expansive, Qi is containing, using SP6 to expand the blood pulse
  • Cultivating the non-rational
  • Pre and Post Heaven micro-cosmic orbits
  • What set Brenda off on the path of Chinese medicine
  • The rift between academic and folk Chinese medicine
  • Qi anatomy
  • Daoist practices to reactivate pre-heaven influences in the body
  • Be careful not to take the opinions of experts as truth
  • Discovering the empty space between words
  • Staying present with the discomfort of having things not go the way you expect in clinic
  • The way the Classics speak to us in different ways as we deepen our experience

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Use acupressure and the pulse to determine if a particular acupuncture point will be useful in a given treatment.
For example: as the right pulse reflects Qi and the left pulse reflects Blood; determine if one side is:
1. Stronger than the other (in which case draining/dispersing is called for) or
2. One side is weaker than the other (in which case, tonification/supplementation is required)

If you finder that the left pulse is weaker than the right, start by using acupressure on SP 6; if it strengthens the left pulse, use a needle to tonify the point bilaterally.

If SP 6 doesn’t strengthen the pulse, check SP 10; if that doesn’t work, check Sea of Blood points in the following order, ST 37, ST 39, and UB 11.

Just balancing the pulse left and right can be a treatment in and of itself; patients find it extremely relaxing and usually fall asleep.


Brenda Hood Ph.D, L.Ac
I was born and raised in Peace River, Canada. Then wound up going to China to study Chinese medicine after I became disillusioned with a degree in psychology. I spent over twenty years there being completely enamored with the medicine and acquiring a few degrees. After returning to North America spent some years teaching Foundations of CM and other basic courses at NUNM. I’m back up in Canada now working on a foundations book to explain the energetic and philosophical bases of the medicine with an eye to using the classics and historical texts as my sources.

Clinically, I started out using the TCM system, but I couldn’t really get it to work like I thought it should. I stepped out of CM academia and spent a lot of time with “folk practitioners” and cultivators. There are a lot of hidden gems in China though living there and speaking/reading the language was definitely required. Through this, I discovered I could feel and sense the Qi in the channels and eventually began to get a sense of the Qi field of my patients. I learned to manipulate these with herbs and acupuncture to help my patients return to health. After returning to North America, I started taking courses in Japanese acupuncture, notably Kiiko Matsumoto style and further developed my diagnostics using the abdomen. I also began to explore sound healing and gemstone therapy all of which I now happily combine in clinic.

The study of CM is endless, it’s a puzzle I am determined to crack. My most recent course in CM (October of 2019) was with Qiological, Toby Daly and the Introduction to Sa’am Acupuncture course. Blew my mind and expanded my understanding of CM yet again. Yes!

For students of CM medicine, learn to understand the classic texts. Mostly, they don't say what you think they do. If possible, learn some written Chinese. Find some way to gain an understanding of the principles of abstraction and an opening into the abstract/integrative/creative mind. Once this opens up, it can re-integrate with the theories proposed by the rational mind and open up a whole new world of understanding. Cultivation, especially meditation and Chinese energy work — Tai Chi, Qigong — also support this way of thinking. Get out into nature and steep yourself in its presence. Nature and our mindful interaction with her was our first classroom. Most of all participate in your life and be happy. This is the medicine of the Heart whose medium is joy. When there is a quiet joy to what you are doing, it reveals a truth and integrity of being.

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Qiologician Podcasts

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum

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We often consider the Five Phases when doing acupuncture, and the Six Conformations when treating our patients with herbal medicine.

In this Part Two conversation with Sharon Weizenbaum  we consider the interplay of “wu yun, liu qi” the five movements and six climatic qi from the perspective of diagnosis and understanding not just what problem a patient has, but also its progression through time.

Listen in to this discussion on understanding the cycles and interplay of yin and yang that will help you to better understand why a patient’s illness has manifest and how to use both the movement of the phases and the influence of the conformations to treat illness and help your patients.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The classics are a way to shift your worldview
  • The way the Shang Han Lun is organized is part of the information it has to transmit
  • The importance of tracking the Yang
  • The Nei Jing is about understand physiology through numbers
  • The five phases is about seeing what is happening now, the six jing is about seeing how problems arise and potentially resolve
  • The wu yun liu qi is about time/space motion
  • Zang-fu diagnosis is helpful, but it’s static, it does tell you about the dynamic of the organs with the fluids and blood
  • Tracking the yang through open-close-pivot
  • Diagnosis are more reveled than discovered, when you see clearly how things ares
  • A case of leukemia treated with Bai Hu Tang
  • Blood stasis is always a branch
  • Problems of yin conformations is the failure to store, problems of yang conformations are the failure to move through
  • It’s not so much about trapped pathogens, but more about the body not functioning properly
  • The six conformations are not layers, they are a circular flow
  • Lu Li Hong’s Classical Chinese Medicine

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I can hardly believe that it’s been 38 years since I heard about Chinese medicine and caught the bug. Little did I know that I would never recover from my intense involvement in this endlessly interesting medicine. The path of Chinese medicine, for me, has been sleuth-like and consequently circuitous. Though I didn’t know it at the time, graduating for acupuncture school left me with crude tools for healing. There were gaps in my ability to see into a patient’s pathology clearly and to effectively help. What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I had a fundamental assumption that the fault was not in the heart of Chinese medicine itself. It was in my access to the heart of it and in my ability to really GET it.

So began a journey into the Chinese language, extraordinary teachers and the classics of Chinese medicine, always with the questions as my guides: What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I was lucky to be able to study with two super smart Chinese medical ob-gyn doctors in mainland China, Dr. Qiu Xiao-mei and Dr. Cheng Yu-Feng.

Then, The discovery of the depth of the Shang Han Za Bing Lun and its relationship to the Nei Jing and Tang Ye Jing, was a landslide event in my journey, permanently implementing a process that, to this day, clears my clinical vision. Through my own reading and studying, and through the help of teachers like Dr. Huang Huang, Fu Yan-Ling, Feng Shi-Lun, Arnaud Versluys, Edward Neal and soon-to-be Yu Guo-Jun, the path unfolds.

Throughout, I have not been a follower or disciple of a particular tradition. I like to be attuned to what makes sense to me. I like to learn and be aware of what resonates, clarifies, opens up knowledge and what feels limited, contrived, heady or unhelpful. I encourage this process in my students because ultimately, all of us have to make this medicine our own, learn, receive and enact it in a way that speaks deeply to us and gives us those “oh I SEE” moments with our best teachers, our patients.

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