Categories
Herbal Medicine

Cycles of Transformation- Tang Ye Jing and Women’s Health • Genevieve Le Goff • Qi175

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Chinese medicine has a treasure house of methods and treatment for women’s health. From the work of Sun Si Miao to modern day practitioners women’s health has been a key concern in our medicine.

In this conversation with Genevieve Le Goff we explore the transformations of qi through the five phases and six confirmations as we discuss Fu Xing Jue and the mythic lost text, Tang Ye Jing.

Listen in to this discussion of women’s health and some ways of thinking about our medicine from a non-modern perspective.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Submerging the yang
  • Making sense of things in time and space
  • How the Tang Ye Jing fits in with other classics and treatises
  • Being your own devil’s advocate
  • Treating menstrual pain
  • Don’t confuse the transformations of the five phases with the transformations of the six conformations
  • The Shaoyin pivot
  • Sovereign and ministerial fire

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Genevieve Le Goff, L.A., is a Licensed Acupuncturist and Chinese Herbalist. She practices an ancient form of Chinese medicine that has its roots in the Classical Era of Chinese history (Han dynasty and prior). 

​Classical Chinese medicine views the human body as a microcosm of the universe. Therefore the health of the planet is inseparable from ours. In keeping with the highest precepts of the classical Chinese medical canons, a good doctor seeks to understand physiology in an ecological fashion, and to honor the roots of these insights by the observation and protection of natural rhythms.

After graduating from UC Santa Barbara with a BA in Environmental Studies & Ecology, and the Academy of Chinese Culture and Health Sciences with a MS in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Genevieve received special training in midwifery and gynecology, as well as extensive post-graduate training in Classical Herbal Formulation from the Institute of Classical East-Asian Medicine. This formulation system is in the lineage of Tian (Bawei) Heming, who practiced in the tradition of Zhang Zhong Jing's Shang Han Za Bing Lun. She is constantly engaged in research and study to further her ability to help her patients, and is now pursuing a second post-graduate degree at the Hunyuan Institute.

 

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Categories
Cultivation

The Spirit of Medicine • Elisabeth Rochat • Qi166

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There is a kind of poetry to Chinese characters. They gives hints and clues about the names we give to the world. They tell a story.

In this conversation with Elisabeth Rochat we explore, like you’d explore bottles of fine wine, some of the meaning and nuance in the characters 意 yi, 通 tong 命 ming, and 理 li. There are some delicious surprises in this conversation as I’m more conversant with the common meanings of these characters, and Elisabeth’s perspective gives me a whole new appreciation for Chinese language and thought.

Listen in to this discussion of characters, medicine and what it takes to be a human being.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • What it takes to be a human being
  • Humans require meaning
  • The strength of the bamboo is that it knows when to start and stop
  • Removing disturbances is what allows us to understand nature and ourselves
  • We are not reflections of nature, we are in companionship with nature
  • Ming as discernment
  • Humans desire zhi, knowledge
  • The coherence and patterning of 理 li
  • We need both the knowledge 知 zhi and emptiness 虛 xu
  • Don’t look too closely at the emptiness, doing so will ruin it
  • Our medicine does not just come to us, it requires our participation

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Find life in yourself to restore it in your patients


More than half a century ago I started out on an incredible journey across ancient languages and civilizations, striving to penetrate the root of life and the essence of existence. Quite early on, I was drawn in particular to the Chinese tradition, the wealth and beauty of which I was able to grasp thanks to my guides and mentors Claude Larre and Jean Schatz.

Ever since, I have continued to study the medical, Confucian and Daoist Classics, drawing from them essential and vital understandings which I try to communicate in turn as widely as possible to all those who share this passion.
My experience with study groups all over the world has shown that when a genuine exploration of traditional Chinese texts is constantly rooted in clinical practice and confronted with personal experience, it allows the practitioner to develop his art, invigorate his thought and raise his vision and conduct.

By means of this rigorous research into the movements of the qi and in a constantly open exchange of knowledge and experience, I have relentlessly worked to cultivate a loving relationship to the other and to help the people I met improve their living experience. And I have been able to always maintain trust in the source without ever forgetting to smile.

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For information about Elisabeth's books and classes visit her website

Elisabeth has a new eBook coming out that has nothing to do with technique, and everything to do with how we treat our patients.

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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All Organic Fruiting Body, Pure and Simple

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Categories
Acupuncture

Treating Cancer with Acupuncture • Yair Maimon Qi165

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Jing, Qi and Shen— the three treasures. Like so many of these pithy quotes about Chinese medicine there is a lot here if you have taken the time to investigate it and see how it fits within your experience of practicing medicine.

In this conversation with Yair Maimon we touch on the three treasures as they relate to treating cancer with acupuncture, immunology from Chinese medicine perspective, and ways of working with research that help us to further our understanding of our medicine here in the modern day.

Listen in to this discussion that touches both on the classics and modern day perspectives in health and healing.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • How Yair got in to treating cancer patients
  • What kinds of things is TCM good at treating
  • Prevention of recurrence and the treatment of cancer
  • Researching acupuncture and Chinese medicine
  • Immunity from the Chinese medicine perspective
  • Numbers in TCM
  • The importance of good communication

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Dr. Yair Maimon is an internationally renowned figure in the field of Integrative and Chinese Medicine with over 30 years of clinical, academic, and research experience. He is the president of ETCMA, the European TCM association.

Dr. Maimon has been leading a unique research in herbal medicine and acupuncture at Center of integrative oncology at the institute of Oncology, in the largest hospital in Israel and the middle east- Sheba Medical center. Director of Refuot integrative medicine center.

He has published several outstanding research articles in prominent scientific medical journals showing a unique, promising results on the effect of herbal medicine in cancer care and prevention. And is the President of the International Congress of Chinese Medicine in Israel (ICCM).

Founder of the eLearning: TCM Academy (TCM.AC), which is an innovative online platform for expanding the knowledge of Chinese medicine worldwide.
Over the years, Dr. Maimon has developed a special insight in diagnosis and treatment of variety of psychological, autoimmune disorders and cancer, stemming from a deep understanding of Chinese medicine.

In addition to being a man of research and a teacher Dr. Maimon is a fully active integrative and Chinese medical clinician, treating numerous patients and devoted in order to ease suffering and promote healing.

 

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Visit Yair's website
And here's where you can read about the research he's been involved with

 

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Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation Herbal Medicine

The Resonant Hum of Yin and Yang • Sabine Wilms • Qi164

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Chinese is not that easy, and the 文言文 (wen yan wen) the classical Chinese, that stuff is a whole other order of magnitude in challenge to the modern Western mind. 

And yet if we are going to practice this medicine with deep roots into a long gone time and culture, we need access to the stepping stones that have been handed down to us over centuries through books and writing. 

Translating language is one thing. But translating culture, bringing something of the mind and perception from another time, that is a whole other task. 

It helps if you can understand the poetry, the stories, the world view and beliefs of the time. And it helps if you can track the changes in the meaning of words and ideas across the centuries of commentary. 

In this episode we are sitting down for tea with Sabine Wilms, a self described “lover of dead languages,” for a discussion of Resonance from chapter five of the Simple Questions.

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  • Sabine loves dead languages
  • Medicine is a powerful way into culture
  • Farming is about fertility
  • Why Su Wen Chapter?
  • The importance of commentary on ancient texts like the Nei Jing
  • Thinking of the Five Elements as Dynamic Agents
  • Connecting macro and microcosm
  • The paradox of how not-knowing helps us to understand
  • Types of change
  • Understanding change is the key to being a doctor, a sage, a farmer or a ruler
  • Some clinical examples of Bian and Hua type changes
  • Treatment as interference
  • When you think of the element “earth,” think “soil”

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Sabine Wilms 

Even though I don't have a license to practice medicine and don't stick needles into people, I consider myself a practitioner of Chinese medicine in the true and grand sense of “medicine” as expressed in the Chinese classical literature: the harmonizing of Heaven and Earth in our pivotal role as humans. While I do have a serious academic background, with a PhD in East Asian Studies and Medical Anthropology, I have always been more interested in exploring the practical applications of what I read, study, and translate, both for myself and for clinicians. As a biodynamic goat farmer in the mountains of northern New Mexico, I learned many valuable lessons on agriculture in my younger years that I find eminently relevant to my ability to comprehend the classical medical texts. Managing waterways, ruling a country, freeing blocked flow, distributing moisture and nutrition, fending off external invasion, restoring fertility, or simply “nurturing life” (yangsheng)… all of these are reflections of the sage’s ability to attune yin and yang and to align her- or himself with the ever-changing transformations of qi that occur in the various microcosms in resonance with the macrocosm. 

I do love to teach and to share my understanding of Chinese medicine, and of classical Chinese culture, philosophy, literature, and religion, with modern Western clinical practitioners and students. So until last year, I was teaching full-time in the doctoral program at the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon. These days, though, I prefer a much quieter simpler life and am happy as a clam in my new home on magical Whidbey Island north of Seattle where I write, translate, and publish (as Happy Goat Productions), and go for a blissful swim in the sea when my brain needs a break. In addition, I do some traveling for lectures and retreats and am in the process of building a mentoring program (ImperialTutor.com) for the more personalized instruction style that I love best, to teach Western practitioners of Chinese medicine how to read the classics.
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Links and Resources

Visit Sabine's website for her books, blog and speaking schedule.
Looking for some mentoring? The Imperial Tutor is at your service.
Did I mention in the podcast conversation that Humming With Elephants is a delicious read?

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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All Fruiting Body, No Grain Filler

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation

Spirals, Stems and Branches: The Structure of Unfoldment in Time and Space • Deborah Woolf • Qi162

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Stems and Branches are old Chinese science. Our medicine touches on it, but most of us rely on the more modern perspectives for our clincal work. The Stems and Branches speak to a perspective of the universe and our place in it that is foreign to our minds not because of language and culture, but because we live a world that focus more on humanity than cosmos.

In this conversation we touch on the influence of numbers, the spiral nature of unfoldment and change, a few things about the Hun and Po that will surprise you, how time and space give us different glimpses into reality and how a sense of playfulness wtih medicine and philosophy just might be a most wise approach.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • How Deborah found her way to studying the Stems and Branches
  • Closing of the heart septum and its relation to Imperial and
  • Ministerial Fire
  • Are we looking from heaven or looking from earth. From the creative or the created?
  • Chinese medicine and philosophy is numbers based
  • 五運六氣 five movements and six qi, Su wen 66-74
  • A deeper look at Hun and Po
  • The three in one
  • Orienting in Time and Space
  • How to read the Su Wen
  • Considering the extraordinary fu
  • Latest interests and projects
  • Advice to new practitioners

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Keep it simple; if you can immerse yourself as much as possible in classical Chinese way of seeing the cosmos/body then you will always do things better!

Keep going back to the basics: what everything is based on gives you ALL the clues… that's why theory and study of classical Chinese history/culture/language helps acupuncturists to be much better practitioners


Deborah Woolf, L.Ac

I am crazy keen acupuncturist and super enthusiastic lecturer, who, by chance, have discovered and loved the cosmology and numerology inherent in Chinese Philosophy and Medicine. I was lucky to start studying (10 years after I know I wanted to be an acuouncturist) at the UK college that teaches the most philosophy and theory, based on Five Phases, wuxing 五行, and Stems and Branches, wuyun liuqi 五運六氣. My course was a 5 year long extravaganza, and I came out the other side, exhausted, changed and driven. Since then (20 years ago) I have not stopped treating, teaching and studying: these three activities interact fruitfully with each other, allowing me to deepen my understanding and practice of this amazing approach to health, the body and the cosmos.

As I am the daughter of academics I took what I was taught and read around the subjects, so that I was able to immerse myself more fully in ancient Chinese culture. I have followed Elisabeth Rochat de la Vallee for 25 years, and have studied classical Chinese for at least 15 years. I may not be able to ask for soup, but I can make a stab at translating very obscure classical Chinese texts! This immersion and reading and teaching has allowed me to apply my ‘apprentice' style learning to my practice. I thoroughly appreciate and love what I do and am grateful daily for the opportunity to learn more and more and so be able to help my patients even more!

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Links and Resources

Number six in the Umbrella Academy is Ben, the dead one. Or is he?

We talked in this episode about the magic square, here's more intel on it. We also discussed other ways of divining the cosmos.

Su Wen 11
“Brain, Marrow, bones, vital circulations (mai), Gall Bladder, Uterus: these six are produced by the qi/Breaths of Earth. They store the Yin and they reflect the image of the Earth. Their name is ‘the extraordinary and permanent fu’ (qi heng zhi fu).

The St, Co, Si, Th, Bl, these 5 are produced by the Breaths of Heaven; their Breaths reflect the image of Heaven; this is why they make flow and do not store. They receive the unclear Breaths of the 5 zang. Their name is ‘the fu for transmission and transformation’. They cannot keep for a long time without transmitting so as finally to flow out/evacuate… Thus the 5 zang store the essences/Breaths [Jingqi] and do not make flow… The 6 fu transmit and transform and do not store.”

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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The Power of Concentration

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Voices of Our Medical Ancestors- Using the classic texts in modern practice • Leo Lok • Qi159

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We give a great amount of respect to the Classics in Chinese medicine, but understanding these foundational texts of our medicine can be challenge, even if you do understand the old form of Chinese.

Just as many of struggle to get through the brilliance of Shakespeare, the classics of Chinese medicine require a particular kind of attention. And it doesn't hurt if you actually can understand the “gu wen” classical Chinese language. It's even more helpful if you engaged the other classic literature of China from an early age.

Our guest in this episode Leo Lok did just that, and in this conversation we see how terse lines from the classics can speak eloquently to confusing cases in the modern clinic.

Listen in and get a glimpse at how the classics can be applied to difficult clinical cases. You'll be wanting to spend more time with the Su Wen (Simple Questions) after this!

 

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Show Highlights

  • The classic Chinese literature and its influence
  • Modern mind and its perception of the ancient world
  • Using images to bring more understanding of the philosophy/non material things
  • Case discussion, Paleo and banana diet
  •  How to better understand the context of concepts, like children learning language through emotion response to scenarios
  • Case discussion, sprained finger and healthy diet
  • Case discussion, some trouble with breathing
  • Suggestions to listeners to get better understanding of the classic
  • How the classics can be a bit dry and how we can put the juice back into it
  • Connecting the ancient texts to modern experience

The guest of this show 

Leo Lok L.Ac. (M.Ac.O.M) is a licensed practitioner of Chinese Medicine and has a private practice in the San Francisco Bay Area.

He is also the creator of “Voices of Our Medical Ancestors” (www.facebook.com/cma.Voices), a Facebook page that highlights the vast historical treasures of Chinese medical literature via multimedia presentations.

An avid contributor of the 4500-member group: “Scholars of Chinese Medicine“, Leo has helped researched and answered more than a thousand questions on the historical development, interpretations and translations of Chinese medical topics for colleagues worldwide.

 


Links and Resources

Visit the Voices of Our Medical Ancestors over on Facebook.

 

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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The Classical Medicine You Love

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Categories
Acupuncture

Medicine From the Heart- The Practice of Saam Acupuncture • Toby Daly • Qi154

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Chinese medicine is not one medicine; it’s a kaleidoscopic plurality. There is no one true acupuncture; we have a rich ecosystem of perspectives and methods.

The trouble with learning something new is that we have let loose of our current understanding usually acquired through effort and hard work. It’s hard to release what we’ve struggled to learn. Our limited understanding of the terrain becomes our turf. It takes a certain amount of confidence in ourselves, and recognition we know we don’t know, to be able to learn something new that may contradict or call into question that which we comfortably feel like we can rely upon.

Two years ago I started learning Saam acupuncture on a hunch after reading Toby Daly’s article from the Journal of Chinese Medicine. It was at first unpleasantly mind-bending, it took me far afield of what comfortably felt like competence. It invited me into another perspective that eventually came full circle, in that it connected up some of the streams of herbal medicine that I’d been following over the years.

In this conversation, two years after my first podcast discussion with Toby, I’m able to bring a different set of questions and perspectives now that I’ve got a taste for how the Five Phases and Six Conformations connect in ways I could not previous see.

Listen into to this conversation to get a sense of lenses and perspectives of the Buddhist monastic stream of Saam acupuncture.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Michael’s experience of learning from clinical experience by having the Saam system be the teacher
  • Four points is plenty if you diagnosis is accurate
  • Each point you put in takes a little qi from the patient, because you are asking the body to do something
  • Stay with and go deep on the basic principles
  • Questions on the Kidney/Small Intestine counterbalance
  • The Kidney consolidates fire and water, and the Small Intestine disperses it
  • Balancing the entire system means everything gets a little better
  • Clinic is like a mixed martial arts fight
  • Experience helps with recognizing patterns in a reliable way
  • Treating the trauma that comes from rapid and ceaseless change
  • You can supplement the Lung to help with the sadness and grief of this time, and to help with emotional shielding you can tonify the Liver
  • Attending to excess and deficiency is a key element of making sense in the chaos of clinical
  • Rapid clinical feedback hones your diagnostic skills quickly
  • You know you’ve got some skill when you know the right times to refer out
  • Practice makes progress

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One way to tell if your treatment is correct or not is to watch the complexion on the face. If it gets white, red or blotchy, then the treatment is not right.


Toby Daly, L.Ac, P.hD
I began studying Chinese medicine in 1997 with Sunim Doam a Korean monk trained in the Saam tradition. I earned a master's degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine in 2002 upon completion of training at the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco and Chengdu University in China. During my four years of training in San Francisco, I interned with Dr. Angela Wu who taught me how to apply the lofty theories I was studying in school into the pragmatic setting of a busy clinic. She also taught me how to eat an entire cheesecake in one sitting! In 2013, I developed the Chinese Nutritional Strategies app to provide digital access to the wealth of Chinese dietary wisdom.

In 2016, proving once again that some people never learn, I completed a PhD in Classical Chinese Medicine under the guidance of 88th generation Daoist priest Jeffery Yuen.

 

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Links and Resources

Episode 45 is the first of several conversations on Saam acupuncture. 
This is the follow-up conversation that goes deeper into the character of the channels.
Andreas Bruch also studied Saam acupuncture from the scholar lineage.

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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All Fruiting Body, No Grain Filler

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The Language of Connection

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation

Untangling Emotion • Lillian Bridges • Qi153

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We often think of emotion as one thing. That we are sad, or angry, or frustrated, or joyous. But often it’s more complicated than that. Many times there will be an entanglement of emotion. Love and anger, grief and guilt, or excitment and anxiety. It’s when emotions get entangled people can really get stuck as it is hard to sort work through one emotion when it’s intimately connected with another toward which you’re not attending .

In this conversation with Lillian Bridges we explore our emotional makeup, how it shows on the face, and how we can use the dynamics of the five phases to better understand and sort out these deep internal influences that can so dramatically effect our physiology and relationships.

Listen into this conversation that goes into our “internal weather,” the right use of Will and how our feelings can strongly influence our perceptions and perspectives.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The problem of overusing or underusing emotion
  • It is the nature of emotion to seek expression, for it to go out and come in
  • Emotions are often tangled together, which is what makes resolving some difficult at times
  • Sadness may reside it the Lung, but it can come from the Heart, or the Liver for that matter
  • Dread is a combination of worry and fear
  • Wood goes to the past, Metal looks toward the future with ideas and ideals
  • How to tell if someone is introvert or extrovert
  • Opposites tend to look alike
  • After the age of sixty you can’t use your Will in a way that goes against your higher good
  • Be careful with your metrics for comparison
  • Chinese medicine is amazing for adapting to new circumstances
  • Wood and Fire have a difficult time with isolation
  • How to use face reading if you don’t know how to face read
  • To love someone else is to forgive them for not being you
  • If you find the emotion underneath the action, you’ll know what element it is
  • We have exactly the right body we need to express the unique gifts we have
  • Nothing is missing
  • The importance of fulling your worldly obligations 

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I learned about Daoist Philosophy, which includes the ancient science of Face Reading and the ancient art of Feng Shui, from my Chinese family, most specifically from my Grandmother, Mary Chien Lowe and from my uncles. I was taught in the apprenticeship method from the time I was 5 years old until I was in my early 20’s.  I actually thought that every family knew such things and when I discovered that it was not common, I decided to write a book about my family’s teachings. It took many years as I had to connect the things I learned in the holistic Chinese way with the Western need for details. My first book, Face Reading in Chinese Medicine came out in 2003 and the 2nd Edition was published in 2012.

I have spent many years traveling around the world teaching Face Reading and Facial Diagnosis to Doctors, Acupuncturists and other Health Practitioners at conferences and schools and  to Business Management teams. I have also taught and practiced Five Element Feng Shui, working with developers and individuals utilizing the principles of Daoist Design to enhance the “outer body” of homes and offices. In addition, I’ve read thousands of wonderful faces and enjoy helping people recognize more about who they are, what’s wonderful about them and where they can potentially go, and they can do in the world, which I call their Golden Path.  It makes me very happy to help people and encourage them to become their best selves and live their best lives.

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Links and Resources

Visit Lillian's website
Face Reading in Chinese Medicine is Lillian's gift to our profession

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Tracing the Wind- Designing and Implementing a Study on the Treatment of Symptoms from Possible Covid19 with Chinese Herbal Medicine • Lisa Taylor-Swanson & Lisa Conboy • Qi145

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The scientific method is useful. It helps us to better understand the world by screening out our biases, beliefs and wishful thinking. The process of crafting a good hypothesis begins not with a great question, but first the more yin process of observation. Seeing what is present, and from there we can begin to distill out questions worth asking.

Much of traditional research is not that helpful in understanding Chinese medicine, as our medicine does not lend itself to the binary world of double blind studies. Our medicine requires research methodologies that can handle emergent dynamic systems. And lucky for us, those models exist and one of the researchers who is keen on these models also happens to be a Chinese medicine practitioner.

In this special podcast episode researchers Lisa Taylor-Swanson and Lisa Conboy share with us the design of a study that is currently being carried at the Seattle Institute of East Asian Medicine on the treatment of symptoms that may be related to Covid19 disease using Chinese Herbal Medicine. This study is geared toward collecting data that will help to guide further research. It’s a study that considers Chinese medicine on its own terms. And this study’s design principles are not unlike the principles of our medicine.

Listen in for a look at how this study is being structured, and then check back in a few weeks as we’ll have a conversation with the practitioners at SIEAM who are treating patients and collecting the data.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Gaps in evidence base of knowledge
  • Researching Chinese medicine on Chinese medicine’s terms
  • Using pragmatic design
  • Need for clear observation before deciding what questions to ask
  • Truth vs Emergence
  • Information is alive
  • Empathy and observation
  • Is there a perfect state of health?
  • How the SIEAM study is constructed and what we are looking for
  • Emergence and living systems are inherently unpredictable
  • The exqusite beauty of a big dataset
  • Who we ask, how we ask and cultural assumptions

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Lisa Taylor-Swanson, Ph.D, L.Ac
 I am a happy geek who has fallen in love with both clinical practice and with research. Let me tell you a bit about each part of my career, and how they connect with one another. I started out as an undergrad investigating mother-infant communication. At about age 21, I discovered dynamic systems theory. That theory pretty much sums up how I see, think, and feel. It's the idea that the whole is not merely the sum of its parts and that to best understand any phenomenon, we must study the whole. It was a natural fit, then, for me to study traditional East Asian medicine (TEAM) given the holistic framework we use to diagnose and treat people. It was with this whole systems, whole person framework that I moved from Utah to Washington to study at Seattle Institute of East Asian Medicine.

Research is fun. It is creative, generative, and dynamic. I am interested in discovering how we can more fully experience our body – embodiment, or embodied self-awareness – and live less in our heads.

We are inherently social beings and that social context, re-created in healthy and nurturing clinical contexts, supports embodiment and being present in one's lived experience. My research is investigating these topics, and a few others. I've been so incredibly fortunate to complete at PhD at the University of Washington and most recently join the faculty at the University of Utah (my undergraduate alma mater!). I'm one of a couple of handfuls of acupuncturist-researchers and I'm happy to live my dreams.


Lisa Conboy, Sc.D
Lisa is a social epidemiologist and a sociologist with an interest in the associations between social factors and health. 

She is published in the areas of Women's Health, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and qualitative research methodology. An Instructor at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, she is also the research director and faculty at the New England School of Acupuncture where she teaches research methodology and oversees multiple projects. 

She is also a founding member of the Kripalu research collaborative which examines the mental, physical, and spiritual benefits of yoga, meditation,

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Trusting the Fundamentals- Using Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Epidemic Disease • Heiner Fruehauf • Qi135

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For those of us in North America the world changed about three weeks ago as the Covid-19 began to make itself known. And as Chinese medicine practitioners begin to close their in-person practice and open up video visits with patients for herbal consultations there is an increasing interest in how we in the modern world, facing this particular pandemic, can use our medicine to help.

Heiner Fruehauf has been translating some of the writing and communications of his friend and colleague Dr Liu Li Hong who has been in Wu Han treating patients for a couple months now.

In this conversation we touch both on the one size fits all formulas that have shown effect in protecting staff from infection, and the importance of applying our Chinese medicine 辨證理論 bian zheng li lun, principles of differential diagnosis.

Listen into this report from the front lines of China, and how we can help our patients and each other as it is now our turn to confront this epidemic.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Background on the report from china
  • 合病 He Bing, 並病 Bing Bing, 兩感Liang Gan
  • In the preface of the Shang Han Lun we find that disease will not always follow a neat progression, and is descriptive of what is being seen with Covid-19 patients
  • Ma Xing Shi Tang can be considered for a Tai Yang/Yang Ming complexity syndrome, where there is cold on the outside and heat on the inside
  • Overlaps been Shang Han and Wen Bing perspectives
  • Do you really trust the medicine?
  • Using the prescriptions as a kind of reference tool for your own clinical reasoning
  • Attending to the syndromes that arise as a response of the body in relation to internal or external influences
  • The contradiction between a standardized formula being very effective in protecting doctors in a hospital and the perspective that differential diagnosis is essential for effective treatment
  • The critical distinction between 法fa, method and 方,fang prescription
  • The 五運六氣 wu yun liu qi perspective on why the “regular” flu was also severe this year
  • Being infected on the psycho-social-emotive level
  • Qing Fei Pai Du Tang
  • Some precautions practitioners can take for themselves
  • How it is the that Taiyang Urinary Bladder channel is a pre

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Heiner Fruehauf, P.hD, L.Ac

I have researched Chinese culture and medicine for 40 years, and was originally trained as a sinologist at the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Due to personal health challenges, I engaged in the full-time study of the clinical aspects of Chinese medicine in 1989. After several years of post-doctoral studies in Chengdu, I founded the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon.

My interest in preserving some of the traditional features of Oriental medicine led me to develop a database dedicated to the archiving of classical knowledge, where a selection of my publications can be accessed at ClassicalChineseMedicine.or). My strong belief in the clinical efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine lead me to establish the Hai Shan Center, a clinic in the Columbia River Gorge specializing in the treatment of difficult and recalcitrant diseases. Out of concern over the rapidly declining quality of medicinals from mainland China, I founded the company Classical Pearls that specializes in the import of wild-crafted and sustainably grown Chinese herbs (ClassicalPearls.org).

 

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Links and Resources

Visit Heiner's site on Classical Chinese Medicine.
His herb company Classical Pearls has some unique formulations.  

Articles about Covid-19 that Heiner has translated:
Dr Liu Li Hong's Report From Wu Han
The Dampness Epidemic: Exploring the Clinical Characteristics of COVID-19 in Shanghai

 

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