Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum • Qi160

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We often consider the Five Phases when doing acupuncture, and the Six Conformations when treating our patients with herbal medicine.

In this Part Two conversation with Sharon Weizenbaum  we consider the interplay of “wu yun, liu qi” the five movements and six climatic qi from the perspective of diagnosis and understanding not just what problem a patient has, but also its progression through time.

Listen in to this discussion on understanding the cycles and interplay of yin and yang that will help you to better understand why a patient’s illness has manifest and how to use both the movement of the phases and the influence of the conformations to treat illness and help your patients.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The classics are a way to shift your worldview
  • The way the Shang Han Lun is organized is part of the information it has to transmit
  • The importance of tracking the Yang
  • The Nei Jing is about understand physiology through numbers
  • The five phases is about seeing what is happening now, the six jing is about seeing how problems arise and potentially resolve
  • The wu yun liu qi is about time/space motion
  • Zang-fu diagnosis is helpful, but it’s static, it does tell you about the dynamic of the organs with the fluids and blood
  • Tracking the yang through open-close-pivot
  • Diagnosis are more reveled than discovered, when you see clearly how things ares
  • A case of leukemia treated with Bai Hu Tang
  • Blood stasis is always a branch
  • Problems of yin conformations is the failure to store, problems of yang conformations are the failure to move through
  • It’s not so much about trapped pathogens, but more about the body not functioning properly
  • The six conformations are not layers, they are a circular flow
  • Lu Li Hong’s Classical Chinese Medicine

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I can hardly believe that it’s been 38 years since I heard about Chinese medicine and caught the bug. Little did I know that I would never recover from my intense involvement in this endlessly interesting medicine. The path of Chinese medicine, for me, has been sleuth-like and consequently circuitous. Though I didn’t know it at the time, graduating for acupuncture school left me with crude tools for healing. There were gaps in my ability to see into a patient’s pathology clearly and to effectively help. What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I had a fundamental assumption that the fault was not in the heart of Chinese medicine itself. It was in my access to the heart of it and in my ability to really GET it.

So began a journey into the Chinese language, extraordinary teachers and the classics of Chinese medicine, always with the questions as my guides: What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I was lucky to be able to study with two super smart Chinese medical ob-gyn doctors in mainland China, Dr. Qiu Xiao-mei and Dr. Cheng Yu-Feng.

Then, The discovery of the depth of the Shang Han Za Bing Lun and its relationship to the Nei Jing and Tang Ye Jing, was a landslide event in my journey, permanently implementing a process that, to this day, clears my clinical vision. Through my own reading and studying, and through the help of teachers like Dr. Huang Huang, Fu Yan-Ling, Feng Shi-Lun, Arnaud Versluys, Edward Neal and soon-to-be Yu Guo-Jun, the path unfolds.

Throughout, I have not been a follower or disciple of a particular tradition. I like to be attuned to what makes sense to me. I like to learn and be aware of what resonates, clarifies, opens up knowledge and what feels limited, contrived, heady or unhelpful. I encourage this process in my students because ultimately, all of us have to make this medicine our own, learn, receive and enact it in a way that speaks deeply to us and gives us those “oh I SEE” moments with our best teachers, our patients.

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Voices of Our Medical Ancestors- Using the classic texts in modern practice • Leo Lok • Qi159

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We give a great amount of respect to the Classics in Chinese medicine, but understanding these foundational texts of our medicine can be challenge, even if you do understand the old form of Chinese.

Just as many of struggle to get through the brilliance of Shakespeare, the classics of Chinese medicine require a particular kind of attention. And it doesn't hurt if you actually can understand the “gu wen” classical Chinese language. It's even more helpful if you engaged the other classic literature of China from an early age.

Our guest in this episode Leo Lok did just that, and in this conversation we see how terse lines from the classics can speak eloquently to confusing cases in the modern clinic.

Listen in and get a glimpse at how the classics can be applied to difficult clinical cases. You'll be wanting to spend more time with the Su Wen (Simple Questions) after this!

 

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Show Highlights

  • The classic Chinese literature and its influence
  • Modern mind and its perception of the ancient world
  • Using images to bring more understanding of the philosophy/non material things
  • Case discussion, Paleo and banana diet
  •  How to better understand the context of concepts, like children learning language through emotion response to scenarios
  • Case discussion, sprained finger and healthy diet
  • Case discussion, some trouble with breathing
  • Suggestions to listeners to get better understanding of the classic
  • How the classics can be a bit dry and how we can put the juice back into it
  • Connecting the ancient texts to modern experience

The guest of this show 

Leo Lok L.Ac. (M.Ac.O.M) is a licensed practitioner of Chinese Medicine and has a private practice in the San Francisco Bay Area.

He is also the creator of “Voices of Our Medical Ancestors” (www.facebook.com/cma.Voices), a Facebook page that highlights the vast historical treasures of Chinese medical literature via multimedia presentations.

An avid contributor of the 4500-member group: “Scholars of Chinese Medicine“, Leo has helped researched and answered more than a thousand questions on the historical development, interpretations and translations of Chinese medical topics for colleagues worldwide.

 


Links and Resources

Visit the Voices of Our Medical Ancestors over on Facebook.

 

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

Trusting the Fundamentals- Using Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Epidemic Disease • Heiner Fruehauf • Qi135

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For those of us in North America the world changed about three weeks ago as the Covid-19 began to make itself known. And as Chinese medicine practitioners begin to close their in-person practice and open up video visits with patients for herbal consultations there is an increasing interest in how we in the modern world, facing this particular pandemic, can use our medicine to help.

Heiner Fruehauf has been translating some of the writing and communications of his friend and colleague Dr Liu Li Hong who has been in Wu Han treating patients for a couple months now.

In this conversation we touch both on the one size fits all formulas that have shown effect in protecting staff from infection, and the importance of applying our Chinese medicine 辨證理論 bian zheng li lun, principles of differential diagnosis.

Listen into this report from the front lines of China, and how we can help our patients and each other as it is now our turn to confront this epidemic.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Background on the report from china
  • 合病 He Bing, 並病 Bing Bing, 兩感Liang Gan
  • In the preface of the Shang Han Lun we find that disease will not always follow a neat progression, and is descriptive of what is being seen with Covid-19 patients
  • Ma Xing Shi Tang can be considered for a Tai Yang/Yang Ming complexity syndrome, where there is cold on the outside and heat on the inside
  • Overlaps been Shang Han and Wen Bing perspectives
  • Do you really trust the medicine?
  • Using the prescriptions as a kind of reference tool for your own clinical reasoning
  • Attending to the syndromes that arise as a response of the body in relation to internal or external influences
  • The contradiction between a standardized formula being very effective in protecting doctors in a hospital and the perspective that differential diagnosis is essential for effective treatment
  • The critical distinction between 法fa, method and 方,fang prescription
  • The 五運六氣 wu yun liu qi perspective on why the “regular” flu was also severe this year
  • Being infected on the psycho-social-emotive level
  • Qing Fei Pai Du Tang
  • Some precautions practitioners can take for themselves
  • How it is the that Taiyang Urinary Bladder channel is a pre

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Heiner Fruehauf, P.hD, L.Ac

I have researched Chinese culture and medicine for 40 years, and was originally trained as a sinologist at the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Due to personal health challenges, I engaged in the full-time study of the clinical aspects of Chinese medicine in 1989. After several years of post-doctoral studies in Chengdu, I founded the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon.

My interest in preserving some of the traditional features of Oriental medicine led me to develop a database dedicated to the archiving of classical knowledge, where a selection of my publications can be accessed at ClassicalChineseMedicine.or). My strong belief in the clinical efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine lead me to establish the Hai Shan Center, a clinic in the Columbia River Gorge specializing in the treatment of difficult and recalcitrant diseases. Out of concern over the rapidly declining quality of medicinals from mainland China, I founded the company Classical Pearls that specializes in the import of wild-crafted and sustainably grown Chinese herbs (ClassicalPearls.org).

 

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Links and Resources

Visit Heiner's site on Classical Chinese Medicine.
His herb company Classical Pearls has some unique formulations.  

Articles about Covid-19 that Heiner has translated:
Dr Liu Li Hong's Report From Wu Han
The Dampness Epidemic: Exploring the Clinical Characteristics of COVID-19 in Shanghai

 

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Categories
Acupuncture The practice of practice

Outside the Box and Inside the Heart Medicine • Amy Mager • Qi108

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The medicine we practice doesn’t just help us to help others. It can help us to live more deeply into our own lives. The challenges, adversity and difficulties we encounter show us what we are made of and build resiliency. The practices we create are a living expression of who we see ourselves to be. Furthermore, the process of creating a successful practice that we want to work in, it’s an on-going process.

Listen into this conversation on the power of mentorship, the transformational influence of having a business, and how being your authentic self is the best way to build a practice you want to work in.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Chinese medicine is about working with the dynamic balance that generates life
  • Medicine that is outside the box and inside the heart
  • The power of a “learning by doing” apprenticeship
  • Aversity and resiliency show you what you’re made of
  • Healing in community, the unique opportunity of a women’s only health clinic
  • Candice Pert and the molecules of emotion
  • The people who are the Zen wake-up sticks in our life
  • Leaning on your personal board of directors
  • CPT code changes coming in January 2020 and why it might change the dry needling discussion
  • The benefit of learning to negotiate money matters at an early age
  • The personal journey of working with inflammation inside and out
  • Considerations on working from home
  • An unconventional treatment for inducing labor
  • The best business advice for someone starting out… Be your authentic self!

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Please remember to breathe. In through your nose and out through your mouth. This sets the brain in alpha rhythms of deep relaxation. If you’re not driving, right now take three deep breaths in one at a time, in through your nose and out through your mouth.


Amy Mager, L.Ac 

My practice is informed by my mentors Maury Stein & Luis Yglesias who taught me about the importance of consciousness. Meaning, we are where our thoughts are. Where we put our attention & intention. Sun Miao said “Medicine is intention. Those were proficient at using intentions are good doctors.” Our feelings follow our thoughts. When we change our thoughts, we redirect everything that’s going on in our body.

I have a profound belief that the body wants to heal itself. We see this when we bring the organ systems into the dynamic balance that generates life in the Sheng/generating cycle. I believe that it is my duty to do the smallest thing to affect the greatest change and to teach my patients how to do that for themselves.

I practice in Northampton in Springfield Massachusetts, and was first licensed in California in 1990. I earned my masters at ACTCM and my DACM from PCOM, I am in ABORM fellow and had the privilege of studying at the feet of Raven Lang Midwife and acupuncturist.

 

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Listen to the knowing in your hands

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Links and Resources

I want to remind us to go back to the classics, back to the Nei Jing. For anyone who wants to work in birth, please read the works of Ina May Gaskin, Sheila Kitzinger, Penelope Leach, and Michel Odent. An incredible resource for patients are the photographs of Lennart Nilsson. It gives our patients an opportunity to visualize the sperm and egg, their meeting, and growth of cells.
 
 
Please feel free to go to my website WellnessHouseNorthampton.com where there are links to free resources to download for practitioners and patients.

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Categories
Acupuncture Herbal Medicine

Considering Our Roots- The Overlooked Basics of Chinese Medicine • Rhonda Chang • Qi104

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We pride ourselves on being connected to an ancient medicine, to a way of thinking, working and treating that ties us back to the luminaries of our field. But medicine is always influenced by the times. And the influences that brought Chinese medicine to the west, and the ways we learned it shape our thought and practice.

In this conversation we discuss the difference between 辨證理論 bian zheng li lun, pattern differentiation, and 陰陽五行 yin yang wu xing, the transformation of yin and yang through the five phases. And take a look at how 醫 yi, medicine differs from what’s commonly called TCM.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • What started as an interest in literature lead to exploring pre-modern medicine
  • Yin and Yang is about tracking changes
  • The links between Yin, Yang and the Five Phases
  • Modern Chinese medicine talks about patterns, but it does not talk about the dynamics of change
  • Case Study: delayed delivery
  • The transformations of Yin and Yang happen through the cycle of the Five Phases
  • Case Study: urinary infection
  • The Yi Jing, the Book of Changes, is the operating manual for Chinese medicine
  • Questions about the Six Jing
  • Discussing the Sm Intestine

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Yang qi is the heat and force of life. When yang qi is lost the warmth and strength of life disappear and what is left is the inanimate yin body. Therefore cooling herbs or emptying yang qi techniques in acupuncture can only be used for short periods, or else accompanied by warming herbs /strengthening yang qi needling techniques.


Rhonda Chang, L.Ac

In 1978 I enrolled in Beijing Chinese Medicine College with the idea of furthering my interest in Classic Chinese literature and gaining a practical skill in healing. To my disappointment, we learnt very little of classical literature. As for the medicine, although we learnt some techniques such as needling and herbal formulas, we gained little to no understanding of how these techniques were created and the real logic behind them.
 
So I began to look for doctors who were trained prior to 1949, in the hope of learning the actual principles underlying yi. Through hearing from some of these older physician phrases such as cooling blood to relieve wind rash, or strengthening the soil to help lung cough etc., I stepped on a lifelong path of discovering the ancient logic of healing.
 
Based on my PhD study The Substitution of Yi by Chinese Medicine through Chinese Self-Colonisation, I published the book: Chinese Medicine Masquerading as Yi in which I explained the differences between modern Chinese medicine and the old style healing—Yi. Subsequently I published Yinyang Wuxing Spirit, Body and Healing, which is based on my 30 years of study and practice, to demonstrate how yinyang wuxing theory directs clinical practice.
 
Currently I am designing an online course: The Book of Changes and Yi易 医. The Ming dynasty scholar Zhang Jingyue clearly states: “The system of Yi (医) is the Book of Changes applied to the body and spirit. How can one practice Yi without knowing the Book of Changes?” 张景岳《类经附翼》“医易义”“医之为道,身心之易也,医而不易,其何以行之焉?” This is an in depth course that aims to provide the necessary knowledge of the Book of Changes, bagua and yinyang wuxing theory in order to greatly enhance both clinical practice and an understanding Chinese philosophy.

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You'll be surprised at what your hands can tell you

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Links and Resources

You can find Rhonda's books on Amazon
Yin Yang Wu Xing, Spirit, Body and Healing
Chinese Medicine Masquerading as Yi: A Case of Chinese Self-Colonisation

Visit Rhonda's website at www.rhondachang.com to stay informed on her teaching and other books.

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum

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We often consider the Five Phases when doing acupuncture, and the Six Conformations when treating our patients with herbal medicine.

In this Part Two conversation with Sharon Weizenbaum  we consider the interplay of “wu yun, liu qi” the five movements and six climatic qi from the perspective of diagnosis and understanding not just what problem a patient has, but also its progression through time.

Listen in to this discussion on understanding the cycles and interplay of yin and yang that will help you to better understand why a patient’s illness has manifest and how to use both the movement of the phases and the influence of the conformations to treat illness and help your patients.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The classics are a way to shift your worldview
  • The way the Shang Han Lun is organized is part of the information it has to transmit
  • The importance of tracking the Yang
  • The Nei Jing is about understand physiology through numbers
  • The five phases is about seeing what is happening now, the six jing is about seeing how problems arise and potentially resolve
  • The wu yun liu qi is about time/space motion
  • Zang-fu diagnosis is helpful, but it’s static, it does tell you about the dynamic of the organs with the fluids and blood
  • Tracking the yang through open-close-pivot
  • Diagnosis are more reveled than discovered, when you see clearly how things ares
  • A case of leukemia treated with Bai Hu Tang
  • Blood stasis is always a branch
  • Problems of yin conformations is the failure to store, problems of yang conformations are the failure to move through
  • It’s not so much about trapped pathogens, but more about the body not functioning properly
  • The six conformations are not layers, they are a circular flow
  • Lu Li Hong’s Classical Chinese Medicine

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I can hardly believe that it’s been 38 years since I heard about Chinese medicine and caught the bug. Little did I know that I would never recover from my intense involvement in this endlessly interesting medicine. The path of Chinese medicine, for me, has been sleuth-like and consequently circuitous. Though I didn’t know it at the time, graduating for acupuncture school left me with crude tools for healing. There were gaps in my ability to see into a patient’s pathology clearly and to effectively help. What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I had a fundamental assumption that the fault was not in the heart of Chinese medicine itself. It was in my access to the heart of it and in my ability to really GET it.

So began a journey into the Chinese language, extraordinary teachers and the classics of Chinese medicine, always with the questions as my guides: What am I not seeing? How do I see more clearly so I can be more effective? I was lucky to be able to study with two super smart Chinese medical ob-gyn doctors in mainland China, Dr. Qiu Xiao-mei and Dr. Cheng Yu-Feng.

Then, The discovery of the depth of the Shang Han Za Bing Lun and its relationship to the Nei Jing and Tang Ye Jing, was a landslide event in my journey, permanently implementing a process that, to this day, clears my clinical vision. Through my own reading and studying, and through the help of teachers like Dr. Huang Huang, Fu Yan-Ling, Feng Shi-Lun, Arnaud Versluys, Edward Neal and soon-to-be Yu Guo-Jun, the path unfolds.

Throughout, I have not been a follower or disciple of a particular tradition. I like to be attuned to what makes sense to me. I like to learn and be aware of what resonates, clarifies, opens up knowledge and what feels limited, contrived, heady or unhelpful. I encourage this process in my students because ultimately, all of us have to make this medicine our own, learn, receive and enact it in a way that speaks deeply to us and gives us those “oh I SEE” moments with our best teachers, our patients.

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