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Qiologician Podcasts

Treating With Moxa • Felip Caudet

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In this “part two” conversation with Felip Caudet we get into the nuts and bolts of how he uses moxa, and how to find and treat “moxa points.”

Additionally there is an excerpt from his soon to be published book String Moxa Method. Go to the show notes page to read or download it.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Fukaya method of moxibustion
  • Moxa and the immune system
  • How to roll rice grain moxa
  • Moxa is a precious treasure
  • Hardness or softness of the moxa cone determines how it burns and if it’s tonifying or dispersing
  • Different kinds of heat and the body’s response
  • Finding “moxa points”
  • Comfort heat is tonifying and the burning sensation creates dispersion
  • The body creates stagnation in the body as a way to slow an illness process
  • Moxa points can present as spongy, gummy or stone-like
  • Points can be on or off the meridians
  • Five ways to find points

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clinic tip


about the guest

 

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Links and Resources:

Here is an excerpt from Felip's upcoming book, String Moxa Method

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Stress is Not Manageable • Heidi Lovie

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Stress management is something we started to hear about in the 1980’s. But compare the “stress” of the 80’s with the 2000’s and we are talking very different worlds. Then 2020 arrives and we wish we had the stress and problems of just a year or two ago.

In this conversation with Heidi Lovie we look at how to handle life when things change more in four months than they used to change in four years.

Heidi’s take no prisoners approach to Covid, social unrest, failing economies, troublesome landlords and political monkeyshines will give you some hope for our off the rails world.

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Heidi Lovie, L.Ac

My patients are my teachers, my inspiration, and my heart. They are the reason I get out of bed in the morning. Their stories move me to tears and make me a better person. Being human is hard. Our bodies and minds, which are designed to provide an experience for our spirit, come with so many issues. But watching my patients navigate, overcome, and conquer their issues heals my own my broken humanness. I can’t imagine a better job.

I believe that the best Chinese medicine practitioners know acupuncture is a last resort. That true healing happens when blind spots are illuminated and that my job is to act as a sherpa guiding people towards the best version of themselves using Chinese medicine as the guiding light. Something transformative and magical happens when people are self empowered, given knowledge, and prescribed resources to take outside the treatment room.

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

The Problem With the Medical Model • Alice Whieldon

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The medical model is useful for certain conditions and problems. It also lends itself to a factory sort of medicine that allows a large number of people to be served using protocols and standard procedures. But when a patient’s issues don’t fit neatly into “the machine” then that system of medicine is not just not helpful, it can bring harm.

Engaging with a patient free of flowcharts and diagnostic codes invites into a space free of agenda and technique. It allows for a kind of non-doing that can allow for a patient connecting with resources they did not know they had.

Listen into this Part Two conversation with with Alice Whieldon on the cost of the medical model.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • What’s the cost of the medical model
  • Distinctions between non-doing and inaction
  • Does the medical model work?
  • Treatment and diagnosis are the same thing
  • The gentle process of attending to the fundamental distortion
  • Working with the patient and practitioner agendas
  • What is help? 
  • You can’t “technique” being with someone
  • Fostering wisdom
  • Inhabiting a neutral agenda-free stance

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”About The Guest” _builder_version=”4.5.3″]

Alice Whieldon MA PhD SFHEA, worked with Kishi from 1997 until his death in 2012.  Together they collaborated on a book, Sei-ki: Life in Resonance, the Secret Art of Shiatsu 2011 Kishi & Whieldon, Singing Dragon, London, with the assistance of his wife, Kyoko.  Alice offers Sei-ki workshops and sessions internationally.  In addition, since the 1980s, she has been involved with the work of Charles Berner and Lawrence Noyes in Clearing and the Enlightenment Intensive workshop – a fusion of the zen sesshin and western communication techniques – see Mind Clearing: the key to mindfulness mastery 2016, Whieldon, Singing Dragon, London. 

Alice was Senior Faculty Manager in Arts for the Open University and remains an Associate Lecturer in Arts and Humanities.  She is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and Chair of the Shiatsu Society (UK) 2016-18 during which time she oversaw a major restructuring and renewal.  With degrees in philosophy and religious studies, Alice is adept at offering the explanations often welcomed in learning Sei-ki.

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Links and Resources:

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Tea Time Talk with Sabine Wilms

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This is the audio from a Teal Time talk with Sabine Wilms. Sabine holds these conversations with practitioners who have a taste for the classic and scholarly perspectives.

I love the translations that Sabine so lovingly puts her heart and soul into. Humming with Elephants with one of my all time favorite books on our medicine. I was delighted to have this conversation with Sabine and how you enjoy it as well.

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Links and Resources:

Visit Happy Goat Productions for the library of Sabine's translated works, and if you are a practitioner or student who would like dig deeper with the classics visit Imperial Tutor

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Unceasing Inquiry • Richard Hammerschlag

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It’s easy to think of researchers as stotic characters in laboratory coats who rely on their frontal cortex and religiously follow the flowchart of “science.”

But science is not a flowchart, and researcher is really another name for someone who grew into adulthood with their curiosity intact.

Listen in to this conversation on luck, intention, intuition, investigation and biofields.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Characteristics of a good researcher
  • Luck, curiosity and rapport are helpful for practitioners
  • Considering 意, intention, meaning significance
  • Intuition vs wishful thinking
  • Researchers by definition don’t know, that is why they are in the process of investigation
  • Separating out knowing from speculation
  • Modern cellular biology
  • Fascia as a communication system
  • What is the dynamic that can monitor and rebalance living systems?
  • Not homeostasis, but rather homeodynamic
  • VERBS- Vibrational ReBalancing System
  • Considering unexpected benefits of treatment
  • Today’s dogma is tomorrow’s dogfood
  • Interaction of human biofields

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”About The Guest” _builder_version=”4.4.8″]

Richard Hammerschlag, P.hD

While I’ve often fantasized about waking up one morning and finding myself transformed into a practitioner of Chinese medicine, the reality is that I’ve always been more fascinated with how to test acupuncture’s effectiveness, and especially, to understand ‘how it works’. In short, I have always loved research… through a 25-year career in neurobiology, a 10-year career directing a research department at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine in Portland, and, at present, helping to grow the Consciousness and Healing Initiative (CHI) and to define a new East/West synthesis of health and healing that I call Biofield Physiology.

Biofields, simply stated, are a family of non-biochemical regulatory mechanisms used by the body. EEG and ECG, as electrical fields commonly examined in allopathic healthcare, are well known examples of biofields produced by the brain and heart. Biophotons (particles of light) are a less understood but increasingly researched type of biofield. My interest in biofields developed in part, from an introduction to external Qigong. How, I wondered, can the body respond to a procedure that may not involve physical touch?

Other questions I am exploring, in the luxury of ‘retirement’, also arose initially from aspects of Chinese medicine: Since acupuncture and other modalities of East Asian medicine are often described as rebalancing the body, is there a whole body system that mediates such ‘homeodynamic’ regulation? Also, since acupuncture is often said to act via Yi (practitioner intention) as well as via physical effects of the needle, is intention a portal through which to explore effects of consciousness on healing?

 

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Links and Resources:

Visit  www.chi.is for more about what Richard is up to and some of the cutting edge inquiry around biofields

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Qiologician Podcasts

The Privlege and Burden of Practice • Rebecca Avern

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Spending time in the clinic seasons us. It exposes us to success, failure and unending questions about healing, wellbeing and connection that over time can help us to sit with our patients in the midst of deep difficulty.

In this conversation with Rebecca Avern we discuss the fortitude that must be developed to sit with the difficult to answer questions that arise in clinic. And how clinical work, while it deepens and enriches the lives of our patients and ourselves, does extract kind of price.

It would not be untrue to say doing our work is a privledge, and it also brings a certain kind of shadow.

Listen into this conversation on presence, inquiry, and listening with your qi. As well as a look at the shadow side of practice.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The surprising sense of relief of not having to practice
  • Our esteem for the luminaries
  • It’s better to listen with your mind than with your ears, better yet is to listen with your Qi
  • Working with our own emotions in the treatment room
  • How does the patient know they are better?
  • Mental models vs presence in the moment
  • That sinking moment we all must contend with
  • Moving beyond “I’m better”
  • Who is doing the “work”
  • The burden we willing bear
  • Beginner’s luck gives us a glimpse of possiblity
  • The right nudge at the right time
  • What is life and death about?
  • Sitting with the terrain
  • We airbrush out the difficulties the great doctors went through
  • Including that part of us that is burdened
  • Being with the questions
  • Entering the stream of life

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When I ‘found’ acupuncture, nearly 25 years ago, I felt as if I had come home.  Over the following years, I was privileged to study and work with several inspiring teachers.  I loved treating patients in clinic, the fact that every day involved deeper learning and at least a few surprises.  I felt honoured that people would share their inner worlds with me and was touched by seeing them evolve.  I thought I was the luckiest person alive to have found such work.

Then I gradually began to shift my focus to working with babies, children and teenagers.  Eventually, I decided to focus my clinical work solely on young people.  Now my clinic days consist of babies with eczema that is so bad they scratch themselves until it bleeds, toddlers who are on their sixth course of antibiotics for a persistent bladder infection, school-age children who have been labelled ‘difficult’ because they cannot sit still in class and teenagers who are having panic attacks on a daily basis.  My days are dynamic, challenging, sometimes heart-breaking and always uplifting.  To see a young person and their family transformed as the burden of illness is lifted, is truly magical.  Now I know that I really am the luckiest person alive to have found such work.

I am now on a two-fold mission!  The first is to help more practitioners feel confident and competent to treat babies, children and teenagers.  The second is to make more parents aware of what our medicine can do for their children, and that it can be delivered in a way that is acceptable, even enjoyable, to their child.

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Practice, Attitude and Success • Lamya Kamel

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Getting a practice started is hard. Part of the process is recognizing the strengths and skills we already have, and the other part is being open to allowing our experience to teach us.

In this Part Two conversation with Lamya Kamel we look at how our practices ask us to grow in challenging, yet essential ways. And that while we may not have confidence in the beginning, over time it can arise when we approach our work with integrity and passion.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Working with insecurity
  • Resonance shows up in all kinds of places
  • Maybe you don’t in the box
  • Learning from mistakes
  • Working through the first five years
  • Balancing optimism and realism
  • Being open to things you don’t see
  • Know your limits
  • Getting business help from SCORE
  • Working for others
  • Asking for help

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”About The Guest” _builder_version=”4.2.2″]

Lamya Kamel, DAOM, L.Ac
I'm your average Chinese Medicine nerd that wants to spend all of my free time reading and learning more about this phenomenal medicine I'm lucky to practice. Like many folks in this field my route here was circuitous. I majored in physical chemistry and quantum mechanics in undergrad, spent two years in medical school before having my first acupuncture treatment and finding my path.

From the day I graduated from my MTSOM program at Pacific College of Health and Sciences (formerly PCOM) I told myself I would never do any work that didn't move this medicine forward. My future wife Kate and I opened our practice within 3 weeks of graduating, and we never looked back. Soon after I started working at PCHS in Chicago I chose to get my post graduate DAOM to have the chance to reignite my passion in research. I am now faculty in the DACM program and chair of the Department of Professionalism for the Chicago campus.

A year after graduating I joined Aligned Modern Health to become the Director of Acupuncture. At the time we had two Chiropractic focused clinics but we've grown to 17 multidisciplinary pluralistic clinics. It's been a humbling experience to grow with the company and be able to offer full-time roles to acupuncturists all over the country. I'm proud to be a part of such an incredible team of innovative clinicians who practice this medicine with integrity and passion.

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Immunity and Resiliency

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With the novel coronavirus spreading through the world, health care practitioners of all stripes are offering treatments and methods to “boost immunity.” Patients and consumers are also keen to find and purchase products with this claim as well. Is immunity what we are looking for, or would it be better to cultivate a vital resiliency?

Chinese medicine does not have an immune system in the same way that we think about it with modern bio-medicine. It’s not that there is a lack processes that help the body to maintain its integrity and function— there are. But those processes are less about identifying and killing intruders, and more about helping the body to adapt and respond.

Each individual will response a little differently to infections or external invasion, and the state and strength of our vitality also plays a key role.

In this panel discussion with Laura McGraw, Toby Daly and Chris Powell we take a look at the “immune response” from the Chinese medicine point of view.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • It’s a western point of view that we have to kill the attacker
  • Importance of taking care of things when in the Taiyang layer
  • Considering a patient’s constitution, areas of weakness as well as blockage
  • We are permeable beings and so treatment needs to be focused on helping the pathogen to pass through
  • Don’t make a nice home for the pathogen
  • Immunity can be seen as the six conformations moving well and working properly
  • It’s important to understand the progression of disease so you can prevent problems before they happen
  • Using Shi Gao to vent the lungs
  • Use of Gan Cao Gan Jiang Tang to moisten and nourish the Lung, and strengthen the zong qi
  • Eating in a way that makes you less friendly to a coronavirus
  • Infection at the psycho-social-emotive level
  • Modulating fear
  • Considering the recovery society and individual will go through after months of insolation
  • What the guests of the show are doing for themselves to stay healthy

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I have been in practice for 23 years, graduated from the International College of TCM in Vancouver Bc Canada in 1997, then practiced in Canada for 11 years before moving and starting a new practice in Portland Oregon in 2004. I have studied with many mentors who have helped me gain great insight and knowledge along the way.

The past 8 years I have been studying with Sharon Weizenbaum and am currently a TA for her Graduate Mentorship Program. Working with Sharon has changed the way I think and feel about our medicine. I have come to understand physiology in a very clear way, how this takes me to a clear diagnosis, and how this looks in terms of the 6 conformations.

I received my undergraduate degree in Food Science from the California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo. I began studying Chinese medicine in 1997 with Sunim Doam, a Korean monk trained in the Saam tradition. I earned a master’s degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine in 2002 upon completion of training at the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco and Chengdu University in China.

During my four years of training in San Francisco, I interned with the prominent acupuncturist Dr. Angela Wu and learned to apply the lofty theories he was studying in school into the pragmatic setting of a busy clinic. In 2013, I developed the Chinese Nutritional Strategies app to provide digital access to the wealth of Chinese dietary wisdom. In 2016, I completed a PhD in Classical Chinese Medicine under the guidance of 88th generation Daoist priest Jeffery Yuen.

My current focus is on sharing my 20 years of clinical experience with the Saam tradition.

Chris Powell is a graduate of the doctoral program in Chinese medicine at the International Institute of Chinese Medicine in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Before becoming a practitioner of Chinese medicine, Chris attended the University of Missouri-Columbia. There he worked on his undergraduate degree in biology and medical anthropology. He also worked on his Masters and Ph.D. in epidemiology and medical anthropology. His research took him to the Caribbean islands for two years where he studied the geographic distribution and spread of infectious disease

Chris is an herbalist specialized in Canonical Chinese Medicine™, a style of herbalism based on the Chinese Han-dynasty classics, and is certified as a Diplomate and a Fellow of the Institute of Classics in East Asian Medicine.

He lives and practices in Kansas City, MO

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Tidal Flows and Channel Resonance • Brenda Hood

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The 子午 zi wu, “Chinese Clock” that helps us to learn the flow of qi through the channels can give us a glimpse into many underlying dynamics of organ relation, influences of the six qi and the five phases.

In this conversation we take a deep gaze into what Brenda Hood likes to call the Tidal Flow Clock.

There is a lot here when you start look below the surface.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Originally the “Chinese Clock” was about the channels, not the organs
  • Are organs material?
  • Abstraction, embodiment and meaning
  • Function of the Yangming
  • Open, pivot, close
  • The Taiyang’s resonance with cold, qi transformation and connection to the Ming Men
  • Wind pushes, Fire draws
  • Internal and external weather
  • Being flexible enough to shift your point of view
  • Chinese medicine is not completely rational
  • Stems and branches
  • Thoughts on the Ming Men and Small Intestine

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”About The Guest” _builder_version=”4.2.2″]

Brenda Hood, Ph.D, L.Ac

I was born and raised in Peace River, Canada. Then wound up going to China to study Chinese medicine after I became disillusioned with a degree in psychology. I spent over twenty years there being completely enamored with the medicine and acquiring a few degrees. After returning to North America spent some years teaching Foundations of CM and other basic courses at NUNM. I’m back up in Canada now working on a foundations book to explain the energetic and philosophical bases of the medicine with an eye to using the classics and historical texts as my sources.

Clinically, I started out using the TCM system, but I couldn’t really get it to work like I thought it should. I stepped out of CM academia and spent a lot of time with “folk practitioners” and cultivators. There are a lot of hidden gems in China though living there and speaking/reading the language was definitely required. Through this, I discovered I could feel and sense the Qi in the channels and eventually began to get a sense of the Qi field of my patients. I learned to manipulate these with herbs and acupuncture to help my patients return to health. After returning to North America, I started taking courses in Japanese acupuncture, notably Kiiko Matsumoto style and further developed my diagnostics using the abdomen. I also began to explore sound healing and gemstone therapy all of which I now happily combine in clinic.

The study of CM is endless, it’s a puzzle I am determined to crack. My most recent course in CM (October of 2019) was with Qiological, Toby Daley and the Introduction to Sa’am Acupuncture course. Blew my mind and expanded my understanding of CM yet again. Yes!

For students of CM medicine, learn to understand the classic texts. Mostly, they don't say what you think they do. If possible, learn some written Chinese. Find some way to gain an understanding of the principles of abstraction and an opening into the abstract/integrative/creative mind. Once this opens up, it can re-integrate with the theories proposed by the rational mind and open up a whole new world of understanding. Cultivation, especially meditation and Chinese energy work — Tai Chi, Qigong — also support this way of thinking. Get out into nature and steep yourself in its presence. Nature and our mindful interaction with her was our first classroom. Most of all participate in your life and be happy. This is the medicine of the Heart whose medium is joy. When there is a quiet joy to what you are doing, it reveals a truth and integrity of being.

 

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Links and Resources:

Here is a link to the Tidal Flow clock that we discuss in this episode.

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Discovering What It Means to be a Doctor • Poney Chiang

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In our last conversation with Poney, we talked about the neurological view of acupuncture points. In this Part Two conversation we’re exploring what got Poney interested in medicine in the first place and how he ended up becoming an acupuncturist when his first interest was in herbs, philosophy and metaphysics.

 

In this conversation we talk about the deep structure of Chinese medicine, kung fu movies, the Yi Jing, feng shui and how life takes unexpected turns. Poney also shares how Chinese medicine allowed him to grow as a person and how it helped him do things he never thought would be doing.

Check out the first interview with Poney about the Neurological View of Acupuncture

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Discussion Points” _builder_version=”4.2.2″]In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • The influence of kung fu movies and what it meant to be a doctor
  • How our ignorance can come to light
  • Poney’s interest in metaphysics, feng shui and the yi jing
  • Doctor as polymath
  • Working as a feng shui consultant
  • Studying the Shang Han Lun and dermatology
  • The elegance of Kampo and biochemistry
  • Thoughts on how one can’t easily escape their destined path
  • Using feng shui and face reading as part of working in clinic
  • Non-rational ways of knowing
  • How language creates mental models
  • Considering the yi jing and ba zi
  • The Dao that can be spoken is not the true Dao
  • The wonderful things about Chinese medicine
  • Thoughts on 虛 xu and 實 shi

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”About The Guest” _builder_version=”4.2.2″]

My research with cadavers and MRI, together with translations of Chinese medical classics informs my view of acupuncture points from a neuroanatomical perspective. This understanding guides how I palpate points and the type of DeQi sensation I expect to obtain depending on the neuroanatomy associated with any point.   I love this medicine because neuroanatomy from Western Science and energetic anatomy from Chinese medicine, are in fact two sides of the same coin. I am grateful that this research and treatment method resonated with many of my colleagues and it has given me an opportunity to author a textbook and to travel the world as a continuing education teacher.  Aside from the sense of fulfilment when I am able to help people with health problems, what motivates me as a practitioner is that my research and teaching is helping to elevate our profession within the healthcare landscape. I am honoured to play a role in the advancement of Chinese medicine.

 

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Links and Resources:

Poney talked about the Joey Yapp and his Mastery Academy

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