Categories
Herbal Medicine

Cycles of Transformation- Tang Ye Jing and Women’s Health • Genevieve Le Goff • Qi175

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Chinese medicine has a treasure house of methods and treatment for women’s health. From the work of Sun Si Miao to modern day practitioners women’s health has been a key concern in our medicine.

In this conversation with Genevieve Le Goff we explore the transformations of qi through the five phases and six confirmations as we discuss Fu Xing Jue and the mythic lost text, Tang Ye Jing.

Listen in to this discussion of women’s health and some ways of thinking about our medicine from a non-modern perspective.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Submerging the yang
  • Making sense of things in time and space
  • How the Tang Ye Jing fits in with other classics and treatises
  • Being your own devil’s advocate
  • Treating menstrual pain
  • Don’t confuse the transformations of the five phases with the transformations of the six conformations
  • The Shaoyin pivot
  • Sovereign and ministerial fire

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Genevieve Le Goff, L.A., is a Licensed Acupuncturist and Chinese Herbalist. She practices an ancient form of Chinese medicine that has its roots in the Classical Era of Chinese history (Han dynasty and prior). 

​Classical Chinese medicine views the human body as a microcosm of the universe. Therefore the health of the planet is inseparable from ours. In keeping with the highest precepts of the classical Chinese medical canons, a good doctor seeks to understand physiology in an ecological fashion, and to honor the roots of these insights by the observation and protection of natural rhythms.

After graduating from UC Santa Barbara with a BA in Environmental Studies & Ecology, and the Academy of Chinese Culture and Health Sciences with a MS in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Genevieve received special training in midwifery and gynecology, as well as extensive post-graduate training in Classical Herbal Formulation from the Institute of Classical East-Asian Medicine. This formulation system is in the lineage of Tian (Bawei) Heming, who practiced in the tradition of Zhang Zhong Jing's Shang Han Za Bing Lun. She is constantly engaged in research and study to further her ability to help her patients, and is now pursuing a second post-graduate degree at the Hunyuan Institute.

 

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Categories
Herbal Medicine

What Acupuncturists Need to Know About CBD • Chloe Weber • Qi174

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CBD is a big deal these days. Is it really the panacea that is constantly being sold to us? How does this substance and cannabis in general fit in with our thinking in terms of Chinese medicine? How do we separate the wishful thinking from fact, and how do we know what constitutes a reliable and pure product from those of inferior grade?

In this conversation with Chloe Weber we investigate CBD from the perspective of Chinese medicine practitioner.

Listen in to this conversation CBD, cannabis medicine and how Chinese medicine practitioners can think about how to integrate this medicinal into their thinking and practices.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • How to know you’re getting a quality product
  • CBD isolate vs full-spectrum extracts
  • Differences between cannabis and hemp
  • CBD and the gut biome
  • Role of terpitens 
  • Contraindications and drug reactions
  • Differentiating indica and sativa
  • Using CBD with Chinese herbs

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Clinic tip here​


I developed an interest in public health and medicine after being diagnosed with Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in high school. As one of the first cases diagnosed in Costa Rica, I was drawn to study Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at CU Boulder where I began to understand how diseases evolve along with us and the deep connection between humans and our environment. Eventually, I was drawn to Chinese medicine as a way to address public health issues. I received my Masters of Oriental Medicine from Southwest Acupuncture College in Boulder and spent time studying at Heilongjiang University Hospital in Harbin, China.

After graduating, I followed my heart and co-founded a non-profit sliding-scale walk-in Chinese herb clinic called Urban Herbs. Running the clinic I was able to see just how beautifully Chinese herbs translate from culture to culture and how essential it is to make our medicine affordable and accessible. Shortly after starting the clinic, my son Remy was diagnosed with an incredibly rare genetic disorder called STXBP1. I dropped everything and Remy and I began our epic adventures in neurohacking.

Working with Remy has lead me to extensively study integrative and developmental neurology and functional medicine and has motivated me to find ways to help children with neuro-developmental issues and epilepsy. While Remy and I both felt better with the many hemp extract oils that they tried, nothing stopped Remy's seizures. As an herbalist I knew I could create a stronger formula to help those with seizures, joined forces with Bart, and Radical Roots was born! In order to help further support other families with loved ones with Neurological disorders, I recently launched a resource website remysrevenge.com and will be launching a podcast around neuroplasticity in the new year!.

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Categories
Cultivation

Soul Pilgrimage, Death, and Loss • Tamsin Grainger • Qi173

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Our western world hides death. We are taught to avoid it. Avoid thinking about, do everything medically possible to prolong life, and focus on “more time” without regard to more of “what.”

In this conversation with Tamsin Grainger we look into how death is inextricably entangled with life. How we care constantly dying to one moment as we emerge into a new one.

Listen in to this conversation on living into the surprising unfolding of life and how the mindset of pilgrimage helps us to transition through the seasons of our lives.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • We are always dealing with little deaths
  • Thoughts on a good death
  • Sympathy and empathy
  • The influence of pilgrimage
  • Sitting in and being moved by qi
  • Not knowing is part of the clinical encounter
  • The wisdom that unfolds within the field of collective qi

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When in the presence of death, never assume you know what is needed. Listen to the qi – theirs and yours – and allow time for the simple as well as the complex.


I am a Shiatsu practitioner, teacher and writer based in Edinburgh, Scotland. I learned the depth of Shiatsu touch on receiving my first session – I felt I was being danced by her. The result was good too – the curse was lifted! In 1989, I started a course and have been learning and giving Shiatsu ever since. My practice began around the time I became a mother and focused on Shiatsu during pregnancy and with babies.

I began to walk pilgrimage in 2016 as I neared menopause and my daughters had left home. There, I realised that I should write about death because the subtle and varied touch of Shiatsu can support people on all levels when facing this greatest of challenges.

 

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Links and Resources

Purchase your own copy of Working with Death and Loss in Shiatsu Practice, a guide to holistic practice in palliative care.

Read Tamsin's blog on the book, grief and Shiatsu.

A short discussion on coherence, quantum physics and shiatsu.

 

 

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Treating With Moxa • Felip Caudet

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In this “part two” conversation with Felip Caudet we get into the nuts and bolts of how he uses moxa, and how to find and treat “moxa points.”

Additionally there is an excerpt from his soon to be published book String Moxa Method. Go to the show notes page to read or download it.

 

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Fukaya method of moxibustion
  • Moxa and the immune system
  • How to roll rice grain moxa
  • Moxa is a precious treasure
  • Hardness or softness of the moxa cone determines how it burns and if it’s tonifying or dispersing
  • Different kinds of heat and the body’s response
  • Finding “moxa points”
  • Comfort heat is tonifying and the burning sensation creates dispersion
  • The body creates stagnation in the body as a way to slow an illness process
  • Moxa points can present as spongy, gummy or stone-like
  • Points can be on or off the meridians
  • Five ways to find points

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clinic tip


about the guest

 

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Links and Resources:

Here is an excerpt from Felip's upcoming book, String Moxa Method

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation The practice of practice

The Sunset of a Practice • Charlie Braverman • Qi172

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Our medicine teaches us that all things move through cycles of generation, flourishing, decline and disappearance. It’s the way qi moves through this world and so not a surprise that at some point there is an end to the practice that has sustained us and allowed us to help others along the way.

In this conversation with Charlie Braverman we discuss the sunset of an acupuncture practice. The opportunities that arise while you still have time to learn something new. The importance of having a kind of support when beginning that goes beyond getting the diagnosis right, and how success sometimes means it is time to move onto something else.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • What got Charlie’s attention that it was time to wind down the practice
  • Criteria for retirement
  • The magic of a letter to patients
  • Becoming an acupuncturist at 46
  • Not good at sales, but good at communication
  • Another “now what” moment
  • Lessons learned as a real estate agent
  • The importance of support and supervision after graduation
  • Knowing for yourself what success means
  • Getting comfortable with ambiguity

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Experience isn't Expensive, it's Priceless


I retired in July, 2020, after practicing for 20 years in Albany, NY. I treated the wide range of issues (and their patients) that present to most acupuncturists. I specialized in treating chronic pain, digestion issues and herpes zoster.

Like so many of us, I combined parts of several disciplines and modalities to create a practice that was uniquely my own. (1) Japanese palpation and pulse, to diagnose (in addition to conversations that would, ideally (but not always), clarify the main complaint and reveal things essential to knowing and treating the patient). (2) Japanese ion-pumping-cord EV treatments as a first, balancing step. (3) Dr. Tan’s Balance Method, an imaging system to treat pain. And (4) for the last 18 years, 80% of the time, the go-to workhorse modality I used was Frequency Specific Microcurrent Therapy.

Every treatment ended with The Explanation and The Expectation: I made sure my patient knew what we had done that day to move us closer to their goals. And I told them what gains to look for: pain that lessens or shifts or becomes more localized. This was to direct their self-observations and to mitigate their unexpressed expectation of complete relief.
I asked my patients to partner with me. and I would often take a few minutes to simplify and trim back complicated exercises that a physical therapist, or similar, had prescribed.

My belief was that doing some exercise was better than doing none (which was often the amount they were doing when the first came in). And doing a simple movement correctly was better than doing a more ambitious one incorrectly.

 

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Links and Resources

I relied on 3 books over the course of my practice: Alon Marcus’ Muscularskeletal Disorders: Healing Methods from Chinese Medicine, Orthopaedic Medicine and Osteopathy, which expertly connected Asian and Western perspective on the same pathology.

Microcurrent Electro-acupuncture, by Darren Starwynn. And Acupuncture Point Combinations, by Jeremy Ross, which is my most dog-eared text. ACP is a comprehensive acupuncture text: the work is organized by Western pathologies, yet each disease is described in TCM terms with clear point combinations. It has a glut of single page summary tables, including Combinations for Burnout (p 449). My personal burnout syndrome was #4.

 

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All Fruiting Body, No Grain Fillers

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Categories
Acupuncture Cultivation

Inner Development of the Practitioner • Peter Mole • Qi171

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Good cookware requires seasoning. A hearty stew takes heat and time. Good wine needs a few years; whiskey, that requires a decade or more. And to develop as a practitioner of Chinese medicine, that ripening can take a lifetime.

In this conversation with Peter Mole we explore the dynamics of doubt and certainty, along with the role of intuition and artistry in the development of an acupuncturist.

Listen into this conversation on the inner journey of becoming a Chinese medicine doctor.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Peter’s path into Chinese medicine
  • Curiosity and an interest in people is a requirement for being a successful practitioner
  • We need to understand and work with a patient’s relationship with their illness
  • Getting through emotional times
  • If you are to heal the sick, first you must forgive them
  • The dynamics of doubt and certainty
  • Checking to be sure our treatments are being helpful to our patients
  • The role of a patient’s vitality
  • Working with Western medicine
  • Thoughts on practicing in the later stages of life
  • Having meaning in life

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As Albert Schweitzer put it “It is our duty to remember at all times and anew that medicine is not only a science, but also the art of letting our own individuality interact with the individuality of the patient.”


Peter Mole

After I finished studying Modern History at Oxford University I started training to be an acupuncture practitioner in 1976.  I studied and worked with JR Worsley until 1992, receiving his Master of Acupuncture qualification from him in 1984.

I studied TCM in the 1980s. I have been teaching acupuncture since 1983, first in Leamington Spa at the College of Traditional Acupuncture and later at the College of Integrated Chinese Medicine in Reading, where I am the Dean.

I am the author of a book for the general public, Acupuncture for Body, Mind and Spirit, and I am the co-author of the text book Five Element Constitutional Acupuncture. I have lectured on Five Element acupuncture in Europe, the U.S. and Israel. I was a founding council member of the British Acupuncture Council.

My style of acupuncture is an integration of the Five Element Constitutional style with TCM. I am particularly interested in psychological complaints and physical complaints that have arisen largely due to the internal causes of disease.

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Categories
Acupuncture

Researching Attitudes Toward TCM • Brenda Le • Qi170

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In this conversation with Brenda Le we both explore how TCM is seen in our Western Chinese medicine world, and how doing this research opened her up to aspects of medicine and practice that she did not previously see.

Listen in to this conversation on inquiry, exploration and discovery.
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  • What drew Brenda to doing this research
  • The purpose that research serves
  • That is TCM?
  • How this research changed Brenda’s perspective
  • First look at the person, then attend to the illness (先看人,後看病)
  • Unruly medicine

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Follow an experienced practitioner. Their first-hand clinical insights are invaluable.


Sometimes, the best medicine can be a simple, home-cooked meal. A quiet moment in nature. Or a laugh shared with loved ones.

I believe wellness – and illness – are often related to dietary and lifestyle factors. As a dietitian and Chinese medicine practitioner, my goal is to help patients not only restore their health, but also maintain their health over time. Although I am very, very far from being a “superior physician” (上醫 shàng yī), I am inspired by the philosophy of treating disease before it arises (治未病 zhì wèi bìng).

I am learning that our medicine can be full of surprises. I started out thinking that Chinese medicine needed validation from scientific research – only to realize that this complex, dynamic system does not conform to linear or reductionist modes of reasoning. Now, I am exploring how to practice dietetics in a way that respects and celebrates the Chinese medicine worldview.

 
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Links and Resources

Read Brenda's research paper both for inspiration and to get a nuanced view of TCM.

And see what she's up to over on her website.

 

Join the discussion!
Leave a comment on Qiological's Facebook page.

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Categories
Acupuncture

The Path of Moxibustion • Felip Caudet • Qi169

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My initial introduction to moxibustion was the classic Chinese mugwort cigar. I hated it. But only because my lungs are the weak link in my chain of being. The smoke was intolerable.

Japanese rice grain moxa, that was a whole other universe. It’s not that less is more, it’s that the focused and directed aspects of Japanese moxibustion invite a completely different experience of heat and sensation.

In this conversation with Felip Caudet we follow his path of discovery with moxibustion.

Listen in to this discussion on mugwort, calling and surrender to the path that beckons.

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In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • Moxibustion and Felipe’s story
  • Felipe’s journey to learning moxibustion
  • Doubts and challenges
  • How to keep moving forward when you’re not 100% sure this is the right decision
  • What Felipe does with moxibustion
  • Moxibustion vs needling

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Apply moxa with your heart. First, listen to the patient’s words, after, listen to the body with palpation. Only palpation can explain why, where and how moxa can be applied


Felip Caudet

I have been a physiotherapist and acupuncturist for 20 years. One day, years ago I fell in love with japanese moxibustion. I decided to leave needles and work only with moxibustion. Big shocks on my life were to meet Fukushima sensei and Shinma sensei (son of the famous japanese moxibustionist Isaburo Fukaya) and be accepted as student.

Going deep in moxibustion, I discovered that traditional japanese practice was not too much known outside of Japan. After that, I took the challenge to spread the work of this beautiful therapeutic art and the style of Fukaya.

Moxibustion can be a way of purification and healing the body and the soul. It allows you to go from the head (mind) to the hands (heart), from the idea to the true action.

 

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Links and Resources

Shinma, H (2015). The Treasure Book of Points Fukayakyu.

Young, M (2012). The Moon Over Matsushima. Insights into Moxa and Mugwort. Godiva Books

NAJOM (North American Journal of Orientl Medicine). Journal full of articles (and amazing clinic tips) written by all kind of practitioners of japanese healing techniques.

moxafrica.org (British Charity dedicated to investigate direct moxibustion inmunomodulation as an adjunctive treatment for tuberculosis, particularly when drug-resistant).

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Categories
Qiologician Podcasts

Stress is Not Manageable • Heidi Lovie

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Stress management is something we started to hear about in the 1980’s. But compare the “stress” of the 80’s with the 2000’s and we are talking very different worlds. Then 2020 arrives and we wish we had the stress and problems of just a year or two ago.

In this conversation with Heidi Lovie we look at how to handle life when things change more in four months than they used to change in four years.

Heidi’s take no prisoners approach to Covid, social unrest, failing economies, troublesome landlords and political monkeyshines will give you some hope for our off the rails world.

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Heidi Lovie, L.Ac

My patients are my teachers, my inspiration, and my heart. They are the reason I get out of bed in the morning. Their stories move me to tears and make me a better person. Being human is hard. Our bodies and minds, which are designed to provide an experience for our spirit, come with so many issues. But watching my patients navigate, overcome, and conquer their issues heals my own my broken humanness. I can’t imagine a better job.

I believe that the best Chinese medicine practitioners know acupuncture is a last resort. That true healing happens when blind spots are illuminated and that my job is to act as a sherpa guiding people towards the best version of themselves using Chinese medicine as the guiding light. Something transformative and magical happens when people are self empowered, given knowledge, and prescribed resources to take outside the treatment room.

 

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Categories
Acupuncture

Balancing the Koshi • Jeffrey Dann • Qi168

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The medicines and martial arts of Asia have long considered the lower belly and back to be of significant importance in health, wellbeing and as a kind of seat of power and presence.

In this conversation with long time practitioner Jeffrey Dann we explore the structural powerhouse of the Koshi, the dynamic lower abdomen with all it’s energetic and physiological functions.

Additionally we explore how to approach the body and appreciate the body and develop a sense of listening and connection that becomes the compass that guides our work.

Listen into this discussion of discovery, appreciation and medicine.

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[/et_pb_code][et_pb_text admin_label=”highlights” _builder_version=”4.6.5″ text_font_size_tablet=”51″ text_line_height_tablet=”2″ header_font_size_tablet=”51″ header_line_height_tablet=”2″]In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • How Jeffrey found his way into East Asian medicine
  • The power of putting your hands on people
  • Importance of the dynamic reciprocal relationship
  • The Koshi and its central role in the body
  • The Gall Bladder as a fascial organizer
  • Using your hands to get information
  • What happens when the symmetry is off
  • Mapping acupuncture points onto visceral junctions and connections
  • Investigating the fascia

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“The difference between a master and great partitioner is in the details.

Master tip: Instead of just driving a needle in thru the guide tube, pause as the needle touches the skin. “Listen and Follow” is the response to the tip of the needle in response to the tissue.

Example: Does the person’s energetic field and tissues welcome OR resist the
presence of the needle. Find the welcome. Meridian therapy tells us to support the ease before dispersing the resistance.


Jeffrey Dann, L.Ac

More than 45 years of study and practice has led me to see acupuncture as a manual medicine. I combine refined palpation, movement, the meridian system, and the structural fascial matrix producing an integrative approach to mind/body wellness. I began this journey as an anthropologist studying martial arts body-mind education in Japan. After studying acupuncture in Beijing, Hong Kong and Hawaii throughout the 1980s, I studied structural acupuncture, SeiTai, Shinpo, and Sotai movement therapy in the 1990s. I then deepened my knowledge of Meridian therapy while bringing leading Meridian Therapy sensei to the US.

I started to put together the Koshi Balancing system with the support of Shudo Denmei in the early 2000s, and for the last 10 years have integrated Barral’s osteopathic Visceral Manipulation into hara abdominal work. Koshi Balancing is the culmination of my never-ending passion to deepen my holistic education while teaching acupuncturists and body workers to integrate manual medicine with the structural and visceral foundations of Traditional East Asian Medicine.

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Links and Resources

Visit Jeffrey's website

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Become a Qiologician and Help to Support the Show

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All Fruiting Body, No Grain Fillers

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